Newb with laminate layout questions.


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Old 04-19-09, 11:50 AM
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Newb with laminate layout questions.

Well, I have purchased all of my laminate flooring but I have some questions regarding the direction the floor should run in my floor plan. I am going to be covering most of the ground floor of the house and it's a pretty open floor plan. Everything will get laminate wood flooring with the exception of the foyer which is ceramic tile, the laundry room and the powder room. I'm on a slab so this is going down on concrete with vapor barrier of course. The kitchen has a really thin rolled linoleum that I plan to just go over top of. Now I have read things that say you should lay the floor parallel to your main source of light in a room, I have also heard to lay it in the direction of the longest wall in the room. Basically, I can think of reasons to do it both ways with my floor plan or even both but I'm not sure which is correct. I should probably mention in case it's not obvious from the plan, the kitchen and family room are completely open to one another with just two small columns at about the half way point. I would be very appreciative if someone could take a look at my floor plan and recommend a course of action.

 
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Old 04-19-09, 01:16 PM
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It looks like the main light sources are in the back of the house, so I think it would look better going front to back. But, from an expansion standpoint, you should consider installing it side to side. Most laminates recommend a maximum of 40 feet along the length of the boards, and 24 feet along the width of the boards. So laying it side to side and using an expansion joint at the dining room doorway will satisfy manufacturer's recommendations for layout. If you have your heart set on going front to back, then expansion joints between the family room and breakfast area will keep it in code.
 
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Old 04-19-09, 04:06 PM
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Thanks so much for responding! I have been driving myself crazy thinking about how this should work out. I believe my wife and I are leaning towards running it front to back. I agree that it would look better that way. My only concern is having to have an expansion joint at the breakfast area and family room. I just thought that having one floor type in the whole area like this would make the space look larger and more contiguous. However, we loose that effect if there is a strip of molding cutting it all in half. I don't want to run the risk of having problems later though so I suppose we will have to break it in that spot. We started pulling up carpet today and are trying to take it slowly. One thing is for certain, it's got to look better than this carpet and white sheet linoleum. I can't wait to have all of that gone.
 
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Old 04-20-09, 02:27 PM
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I don't like long expansion joints either. Maybe you could pull off the baseboards in the family room opposite of the kitchen and on the columns in the middle, and then install the floor an inch off of the wall, then prop the baseboard above the height of the floor (rip the bottom if you have to), and follow that with 3/4 inch quarter round everywhere. It might not be within specs, but there will be no problems because of expansion .
 
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Old 04-20-09, 06:47 PM
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Hmmm...I like this plan. So, if I understand you correctly, the far left family room wall would have the baseboard shoe molding removed and reset to where it just sits above the floor thickness. The flooring starts 1" away from the wall instead of the standard 1/4" spacing. The combination of the baseboard shoe molding thickness and the 3/4" quarter round will hide the 1" spacing on that wall. That sounds way too easy but it makes sense. I would try just about anything to avoid putting that transition across the whole area. Night number two of pulling up carpet and padding. The slab looks pretty clean, this house is only 4 years old so I was hoping it would be. Another question, would it be okay to install the laminate directly over the sheet linoleum in the kitchen? If so, could I skip the vapor barrier there and just consider the linoleum my barrier?
 
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Old 04-22-09, 05:40 AM
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So, just thinking on this some more. I'm looking at my purchased transition kit pieces and noticed that they are only about 3-1/2' long. Some of my transitions are about 4-1/2'. What is the recommended procedure for cutting these to fit? Am I supposed to put the joint in the middle or use a full piece and then cut the small piece to join to it? Or, do I need to find some other kind of material to use in these longer areas?
 
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Old 04-25-09, 06:24 PM
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Another question, would it be okay to install the laminate directly over the sheet linoleum in the kitchen? If so, could I skip the vapor barrier there and just consider the linoleum my barrier?
Go right over the vinyl, but the linoleum is not considered an adequate moisture barrier, so still use plastic over it.
I'm looking at my purchased transition kit pieces and noticed that they are only about 3-1/2' long. Some of my transitions are about 4-1/2'. What is the recommended procedure for cutting these to fit? Am I supposed to put the joint in the middle or use a full piece and then cut the small piece to join to it? Or, do I need to find some other kind of material to use in these longer areas?
Lowes sells nice 6'6" Pergo transitions in many colors that you could use. Or, if you want to use what you have, I would put a small piece on the side that is less visible. You don't want the transition in the center where it will get more wear.
 
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Old 04-27-09, 09:00 AM
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Originally Posted by flooryou
Go right over the vinyl, but the linoleum is not considered an adequate moisture barrier, so still use plastic over it.

Lowes sells nice 6'6" Pergo transitions in many colors that you could use. Or, if you want to use what you have, I would put a small piece on the side that is less visible. You don't want the transition in the center where it will get more wear.
Really? That surprises me about the linoleum. I would have thought it would be thicker and less porous than the poly barrier. I hope putting the poly over the linoleum doesn't make it all too thick. I would hate to have to rip up that stuff though. Although, after a quick inspection it appears to be glued around the perimeter of the kitchen only and might come up pretty easily.

Thanks for the tip on those transition pieces. I found them hiding in the metal bins under the floor samples. It's the same "Simple Solutions" brand that I had already bought but this way I won't have to have seams in my transition pieces. Cool!

My dad and I started on the floor Saturday morning and got two small rooms finished. My legs are killing me! I don't know how you guys that do this for a living get out of bed every day.
 
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Old 04-28-09, 05:50 AM
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Originally Posted by MagicKingdom
Really? That surprises me about the linoleum. I would have thought it would be thicker and less porous than the poly barrier. I hope putting the poly over the linoleum doesn't make it all too thick. I would hate to have to rip up that stuff though. Although, after a quick inspection it appears to be glued around the perimeter of the kitchen only and might come up pretty easily.

Thanks for the tip on those transition pieces. I found them hiding in the metal bins under the floor samples. It's the same "Simple Solutions" brand that I had already bought but this way I won't have to have seams in my transition pieces. Cool!

My dad and I started on the floor Saturday morning and got two small rooms finished. My legs are killing me! I don't know how you guys that do this for a living get out of bed every day.

Edit: Last night I took a closer look at the linoleum, pulled up a piece and it feels almost damp underneath to me. So, perhaps the paper portion of the backing is wicking moisture from the slab? I have decided not to chance going over it and just pull it all up. I hate to do it but it should not be too bad and I would rather have an even, flat surface and put the vapor barrier over it.
 
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Old 04-29-09, 08:35 PM
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Originally Posted by MagicKingdom
Edit: Last night I took a closer look at the linoleum, pulled up a piece and it feels almost damp underneath to me. So, perhaps the paper portion of the backing is wicking moisture from the slab? I have decided not to chance going over it and just pull it all up. I hate to do it but it should not be too bad and I would rather have an even, flat surface and put the vapor barrier over it.
If it was wet under the vinyl, you should make sure it is dry before covering it up. Sometimes it is just trapped under the vinyl because the slab is still wet when it is laid, and a few days of running fans will do the job. But if you have issues like improper grading or a leak, then you will need to go with a sealer that is designed to be used for flooring, such as V-Block or Bostic's MVP.
 
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Old 04-30-09, 10:52 AM
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It appears to be just slightly damp as it comes up. I got all the linoleum up last night and now I'm just scraping up the paper backing and glue spots. There is nothing really sitting up high but I want to get as much of it up as I can. The scraper I have started out nice and sharp but that didn't last long. Time for a replacement blade already.
 
 

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