Leveling concrete subfloor that used to have tile

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  #1  
Old 06-01-09, 09:04 AM
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Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Pearland, TX
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Leveling concrete subfloor that used to have tile

Installed hardwood laminate in the dining room this Saturday. Sunday I was going to tackle the entry way but ran into a bit of a snag. I ripped up the crappy Pergo that was there and discovered that the subfloor was once covered in tile and still have groute/quickset left on it.

Now half of me says the Pergo was on it and never gave us trouble in the 4 years we've owned the house, but my heart says the subfloor is not level and up to par for installation yet. If I put a spare board on some spots the board will see-saw back and forth about a 1/4".

D-I-Y people I know all say this is the spot to hire someone. Leveling can be tricky and you can do more harm than good. Should I just hire someone for this?

If I do it myself what's the best course of action? Try to get rid of all the quickset as much as possible, then see where I stand?

Here is a small pic of what it looks like. As you can see there is still lots of junk on it.

http://i39. tinypic . com /23hpnio.jpg
 
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Old 06-11-09, 07:15 PM
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Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Texas
Posts: 10
Leveling concrete subfloor...

You really have two choices here and neither of them are a quick fix.

1) You could hire someone to come in and level the floor - then attempt to lay the floor yourself...contractors won't like this because they will want to give you a price for the whole job from start to finish - they have a thing about splitting up the work.

2) You could attempt to remove the grout and thinset yourself and pour leveler on the whole floor and hope for the best.

Just because you didn't have any problems with the previous floor does not mean that you won't with this one - your previous floor most likely was tiled pergo, the laminate that you are wanting to put down now would be in strips. That means that not only is the density of the overall pieces differant but the overall pressure ratio will be differant when you are walking on it. Laminate will tend to "buckel" and actually come apart at the seams so to speak if it is layed on an uneven floor. You can actually feel it when you walk on it coming apart. Not to mention that here in the Houston area our unpredictalble humidity makes an unproperly installed laminate floor a nightmare to deal with.

Either way, you are going to have to level that floor. Whether you choose to do it yourself or not really depends on your own confidence level in doing the task.

BTW - could not see your picture at all.

Angel
 
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