silicone?


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Old 09-06-09, 11:38 AM
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silicone?

Hello
I read the following article and do not totally undersdtand it.
But, is it advisable to run a small bead of clear silicone along the filler edges of each piece of flooring to be snapped together, then wipe with a damp cloth? This way all exposed parts of the flooring would be protected so use in a kitchen would be more suitable.
Thank you

>>When we fit laminates in Kitchen/Utility areas we use clear silicone selant or PVA water resistant glue down each 1 length and width of each plank. Once the plank is installed remove all excess sealant/glue with a damp cloth with warm water. Once full floor is installed then all expansion gaps should be filled with more sealant to protect the exposed edge of the cuts. Also when the beading or skirting is installed run a small bead of silicone sealant at the base of the beading/silicone where it meets the floor and also at the base of the kick boards on the kitchen units when they are cut to fit and replaced.
This will then leave a fully sealed floor once installed correctly.
 
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Old 09-08-09, 07:57 AM
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I would check with the manufacturer before doing any type of glue or silicone, either in the joints or the expansion gap. Todays glueless floors are milled very precise, and adding sealants can prevent them from engaging properly, or cause swelling at the joints which will make every seam noticeably raised. Also, depending on the exact product and its core construction, expansion and contraction amounts vary, so adding a sealant around the perimiter may prevent proper movement and lead to buckling. In this type of situation, don't take random advice that may or may not apply...go to the horse's mouth and cover your butt!
 
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Old 09-08-09, 08:46 AM
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manufacturer

I have emailed Armstrong [FRi] and am waiting for their reply.
I'd bet they would not want to void warranties and also because they did not intruct the use of any sealant, they would not recommend it.
If i hear otherwise, I will report back.
Do you have an opinion on this type of floor in a kitchen?
My neighbor did it in a pantry and it is tight as can be but water has a way of finding teeny apertures.
I feel a very thin covering of sealant is the way to go but it is a throw of the dice.
Anyway, I'll l let you know if they ok the silicone.
 
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Old 09-08-09, 09:34 AM
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I am not a flooring pro but have installed it.

My opinion of this product is very low.
It's main benefit is ease of installation to the point that other than following some simple instructions anyone can do it.
It absorbs water like a dishrag, is spongy to walk on which some do not like, joints will show if floor is not even and even with higher end types, scratch easily and can't be refinished.

My experience with laminates includes doing three bedrooms and a hallway for a friend as a favor and then totally redoing it ALL six months later at a very tidy profit when his insurance company paid me to replace it.
A small leak on a hot water tank caused it to sponge into every room.

It does have a place but I believe it is temporary flooring, much like carpet.
It doesn't have any place in a kitchen unless you never spill any water.

If you are not up to cutting sheet goods laying floor tile is nearly as easy as laminate and is much more resistant to abuse.
 
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Old 09-08-09, 12:39 PM
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floor

My gut tells me you are right
If I got a template kit, I could "trace" the floor, let the unrolled vinyl relax for a week , cut it to size and let it lay in the kitchen for another week.
Now I do know if it is best to perimeter glue it or put a dab here and there or glue the whole thing.
I assume the ?mastic will be in the sheet vinyl section. Once the floor is secure I would nail in the trim.
Any tips?
 
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Old 09-08-09, 05:57 PM
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i have TARKETT GENESIS engineered in my kitchen/dining room.
this is some nice stuff. very durable, and looks great. got it at home depot. not as nice as solid wood. but if you have to float it, its the hot ticket. just DON'T USE WARPED BOARDS !!!!
 
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Old 09-10-09, 01:09 AM
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warped boards

My kitchen floor is a bit uneven like many . Is this what you mean?
 
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Old 09-13-09, 08:01 AM
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Originally Posted by peterr
My kitchen floor is a bit uneven like many . Is this what you mean?
no. warped boards are just that. don't use in the main areas. put em under the fridge, or whatever. a warped board will make the flooring act as if the subfloor in not FLAT. as in, the warped board will hold the wood up off the subfloor. and when you step on it, it will drop down.

the flatter you get the subfloor. the better the floating will feel while walking on it.
 
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Old 09-14-09, 05:18 AM
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done

We went with Trafficmaster Allure which is 3' vinyl stips about 18" wide with rubbery, sticky edges all around. The bottom looks like a roofing shingle. Great stuff and recommended for use in kitchns. You do need to fill in some very few crack lines with matching color caulk butnwhen done, great.
 
 

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