What price should I give the landlord?

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  #1  
Old 09-12-09, 05:36 PM
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Question What price should I give the landlord?

I am living in a structurally beautiful house with several other people. I added 'structurally' to the description because the house looks unfinished, like the buyers planned to rent it and at some point during renovations, said, 'OK, this looks good enough... Let's slap a coat of paint on her and pack up!'

Recently, I have begun fixing it up. It's a hobby - It's education... It's also because this is where I bring friends and family. Because it isn't mine doesn't mean I can't take pride in it's appearance, no? The issue of money came up recently, because roommates have left and as hard as I try, I'm having no takers on the rooms. It's simply too expensive for a place in such disrepair (years of renting to college kids). The management is trying to shovel the cost onto us for months of empty rooms.

Yesterday the owner took a tour with me since I was fighting so hard to find a solution. I showed him what I've done and what is still needed and he has agreed to rework our lease with my input and consider the work I've done when negotiating costs and back money owed for empty rooms (we are signed on as a single family).

I've been painting and stylizing each room, but I think what is the most labor and cost intensive project is ripping out the carpet on both stairways and refinishing the original wood. I wonder what estimate I should give the landlord for the work I've done on this?
 
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Old 09-12-09, 05:46 PM
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Welcome to the forums! You took a big chance. Maybe it will work out for you. In any instance where you do not own the building, any renovation you do becomes the property of the owner without recompense to you unless spelled out in a contract. That and the liability associated with any remodeling project could have landed you in legal hot water. Your landlord could have said "looks nice", where's the rent check? And you would have no recourse.
Now to get to your question. We can't see what you have done, and don't know what shape it was in prior to your redesigning. It may pay you to get a professional in and have them look at it and give you an estimate of what they would charge you to do the same work. Granted, you can't charge your landlord what a pro would charge, but you may be able to meet in the middle somewhere.
 
  #3  
Old 09-12-09, 07:29 PM
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Talking RE: Hot water? That implies we have that!

My goal has always been to leave a place looking nicer than it did when I arrived - Sort of like a 'thank you for letting me pay to stay' gift. My parents had always told me to do repairs and deep-cleaning, even painting walls white on my own dime if I was interested in getting any return from my deposit. So far, I've always gotten my full deposit, so... I guess I'm doin' something right!

We've been dealing with an absent minded management company for as long as anyone can remember - the lease makes absolutely no sense and there if little to no follow through on anything... Little ol' me and my constantly growing tool box have been the closest thing to a handy-gal this place has ever seen, I'm thinking...

Actually, I stated to the management in my first interview that I had this hobby and consistently sent emails detailing what I intended to do, what I would deduct and what I would pay for. I gave them an option of allowing me to do the maintenance for legally needed repairs [those within my ability] and told them I would check in on any cosmetic changes before doing them. I asked them to forward all of my emails to the owner for consideration. That I never received any reply told me to go on right ahead and do it, especially as some of the items not seen to could have landed them in hot water (right after I repaired the water heater, that is!).

In any case - I told him I had a few ideas about how to rework our contract and he seems eager to review them when I submit my draft on Monday... He left the place saying that the house looks a whole lot better already, so it seems promising.

As for the way it's looking, maybe I can post some pictures. I'll see how it goes.

[IMG][/IMG]

Mid - The wall doesn't even make sense! These lines were clearly visible with the carpet...
[IMG][/IMG]

Now
[IMG][/IMG]

- Almost there
[IMG][/IMG]

- So far so good
[IMG][/IMG]

God help us all.
 
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Old 09-13-09, 05:34 AM
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I wasn't coming down on you hard, I just wanted you to know the possible ramifications between landlord and tenant. I think it is admirable that you want to leave the place better than you got it. One red flag is they didn't answer your communications. Absence of communications does not imply permission, so be careful. And they only "thank you" they need is their rent check.
The lines along the stairwell is where someone added a layer of sheetrock over the skirtboard. Sheetrock is 1/2" and the skirtboard is 3/4", so you will always have a telltale line there.
Good luck with your contract negotiations.
 
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