Using Cork Underlayment to raise floor level

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Old 09-16-09, 06:14 PM
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Using Cork Underlayment to raise floor level

I'm looking to install laminate flooring in an addition to my house that used to be carpeted. The problem is, when I pulled the carpet and padding I found that the addition to the house sits about an inch lower than the rest of the house and the prior owners had put shims in under the carpet to make the transition appear flat. I'd like to put 1/4" cork under the laminate to bring the entire floor up a bit, making the transition more reasonable. I know they say you should not put an additional underlayment under the laminate if it has pre-attached laminate but is there really a risk with cork? I don't believe cork gives like conventional underlayment and I've heard of people doing this. Anyone have any thoughts on this?
 
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Old 09-17-09, 06:40 AM
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Cork is available as an underlayment for floating installations, and perfectly acceptable by flooring manufacturers...Home Depot carries a 1/4" thick rolled cork, in stock at some stores, and available by special order. I'm sure Lowe's has a similar product as well.

***EDIT****
I may have misunderstood...the laminate you're using already has a underlay attached? what is the subfloor in this area? If it is wood subfloor and the laminate has an attached underlayment, I would add an additional 1/4" of plywood instead of the cork. It could indeed be too spongy with the cork and foam, and the plywood will actually be quite a bit less expensive than a cork underlayment.
 
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Old 09-18-09, 04:29 PM
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Follow-up to laying cork underlayment

Thanks for the reply. Yes, the laminate I was looking at already has a thin underlayment attached and the subfloor it would be going on is, in fact, already plywood. I was trying to figure a way to raise the floor and also reduce the "click clack" sound that laminate is so well known for. I'd thought of stacking another layer of plywood but would doing that over the existing create more squeeking/creeking as you walk across the two layers laid one on top of the other? Thanks again for your insight as this is a new area for me!
 
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Old 09-19-09, 09:38 AM
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More follow-up re Cork vs. Additional Plywood

Lumber Liquidators recommends using cork underlayment even if the laminate has an attached underlayment already. However, they're selling cork too which always makes me wonder about their motive in giving that advice.

If I add another layer of plywood to raise the floor, would I line the top layer of plywood up with the bottom layer or off set it? Would it be best to nail the top sheet down into the joists or screw it to the bottom sheet, screw it through to the joists? Finally, I think I heard you're supposed to leave a small gap between plywood sheets so they don't squeek when rubbing edges but am not sure of that so would appreciate guidance. Thanks for any info!
 
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