Laying Laminate/Staining Parquet

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  #1  
Old 10-26-09, 08:11 AM
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Laying Laminate/Staining Parquet

Hello everyone,

I just purchased a home and I would like to attempt a bit of reno on my own. The second floor is all carpeted and I would like to lay laminate flooring. Is it very difficult to perform such a job? What type of tools and equipment would I need for the removal of carpet and the insertion of laminate? Are there any good guides out there you guys recommend?

The main floor has parquet flooring, which I would like to keep. I was thinking about leaving it as is and matching the laminate with the parquet. But my second option, which I prefer a lot more (pending the additional pricing), is to purchase walnut laminate flooring and to stain the parquet, stairs and railing to match the coloring of the laminate. Would it be very difficult to stain the stairs and flooring on my own? I will probably have to rent equipment for the sanding and prep work of the parquet.

Any opinions and suggestions would be appreciated.

Thanks
 
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  #2  
Old 10-26-09, 06:28 PM
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Welcome to the forums! Removing the carpet, tack strips, and 10,000 staples is pretty straight forward. You will need to determine what was used for subflooring and how thick it is, especially if it is particle board. It will need an additional layer of at least 1/2" plywood. The newer click lock type laminate flooring is a snap (no pun intended) to install. When pricing it, be sure to figure in the foam underlayment necessary for the installation as well as the shoe molding to dress it out against the walls and base molding. Be sure to leave at least 1/4" gap on all edges for expansion and contraction of the laminate.
You would have to remove the existing finish on the parquet flooring before restaining. How bad of shape is it in? If not too bad, leave well enough alone and do it later if you see it needs it. And choose your laminate to the color you want, and don't try to stain the parquet to match it. You will need transition molding where the flooring meet.
Look at your flooring supplier, whether it be a flooring store or a big box and see what tools they recommend. A tap block and a pull bar are necessary (less than $20). Do you have access to a finish nailer? If not, it would make things go a lot faster if you had access to one to do the shoe molding. Remember, too, at no point should a nail be driven through the laminate as it must float.
Go for it. We're here.....sleepy sometimes.
 
  #3  
Old 11-03-09, 09:56 AM
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Thanks for the response.

How do I determine if the floors will need an additional lay of plywood? Is their a certain thickness I should measure on the current plywood to determine if the extra layer is required? I actually don't have much of the tools necesarry, so i'm going to have to buy them all. Is their any special tips I should know about to avoid squeeking? I've noticed a few squeeky floors from home laminate reno jobs...I wonder what they did wrong during the install? What causes this? Unleveled flooring?

The parcquet is just a bit worn, few scratches (8 yrs old). I wanted to do a walnut dark brown finish on the second floor and I wanted to stain the main floor and stairs to match it..I like the look a lot better. Will this cost me a lot to do? What type of tools and hardware will I need for the floors? What's the cleanest/best way to apply the stain to the floors and stairs?
 
  #4  
Old 11-27-09, 10:17 PM
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Anyone?


....................
 
  #5  
Old 11-28-09, 04:31 AM
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Oooh, sorry, the post slipped on me. Where your parquet ends, measure its thickness (probably 3/4" maybe less). Figure in the thickness of your new laminate plus the cushion. The difference will be the thickness of plywood that will need to be laid. I can only guess you will need a 1/4" layer, but not seeing it puts us at a disadvantage, so you will have to do the math. Consequently even if you don't match perfectly, you can make or purchase a transition strip to compensate. Screw down your existing subflooring to the floor joists, then screw down the make-up layer to help eliminate squeaks.
Your existing parquet will need to be lightly sanded to remove the finish. Then you can apply your stain, and your finish polyurethane. I am not a painter, so I'll have one of our pro's check in and give advice on the floor finish, as far as the tools, type finish, etc.
 
  #6  
Old 11-28-09, 05:00 AM
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It can be difficult to change the parquet color. Because it's so thin and put together with wires - you're limitted as to how much you can sand. I've heard that you can sand parquet [down to raw wood] once. I'd get a floor finisher to look at the parquet before attempting to change the color. Refinishing the parquet with out changing the color is fairly easy because generally you just need to sand the top of the finish and apply a fresh coat or two of poly.
 
  #7  
Old 12-05-09, 06:15 AM
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Thanks for the replies. It looks like I have to measure the thickness of the beginning of the stairway for the laminate? I have picture below to show. I'm only doing the upstairs laminate so I might not even need the transitioning strip for the bedrooms, correct? The laminite and parcquet don't meet. I have the parcquet on the main floor. For the carpet, I already see a foam underlay, do I have to remove that as well or can I keep it? The wood pieces with the tac strips obviousl need to be removed, correct?

Also, I know they sell laminiate in different thickness sizes, so I can just measure accordingly and I won't need to add a sheet of plywood to save time..?

Below are some pics:

http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y92/ddzc/ics004.jpg
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y92/ddzc/ics005.jpg
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y92/ddzc/ics006.jpg

Here is what my parcquet looks like:

http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y92/ddzc/IMG_2388.jpg

I supposed i'll try and get a floor finisher out to take a look. I would really like to darken up the floors...worst case scenario i'll refinish it the same color.

Thanks again.
 
  #8  
Old 12-08-09, 03:31 PM
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chandler?





.
 
  #9  
Old 12-08-09, 04:24 PM
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Sorry, snoozing again. Looks as if your transition from the wood on the right to the carpeted area will be minimal. You will need ot pull the old padding and tack strips, using foam padding specified by the laminate manufacturer You may even take an initial measurement at the staircase tread and, using a sander, sand down the edge adjacent to where the laminate will go to use it for a transition. As for the transition from the laminate to the parquet, I didn't see a picture showing that one, only a run down a hallway, and I am sure that was for Marksr on the stain thingy.
 
  #10  
Old 12-08-09, 08:57 PM
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Ok. So the first 3 pics I took, that's the transition from the carpeted area to the staircase. The rest of the carpet goes in all 3 bedrooms and the closets. I don't have the carpet and parcquet meeting anywhere in the house. The stairs have no carpet along with the mainfloor.

The last pic was more for the stain. I just decided that it will take me too much time, work and money to do a dark brown stain. So what I would like to do it just refinish and apply a new polyurethane finish to the main floor because I have dull spots in certain areas of the floor. I'm not sure if they have it, but do they have a darker clear polyurethane finish for parcquet to put a minor tint on the finish so it's not so bright? Not sure if that exists. What do you guys recommend?

Thanks
 
  #11  
Old 12-09-09, 05:07 AM
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It's fairly easy to refresh the finish on parquet [or hardwood too] You need to make sure any/all wax is removed and do a light sanding. 1-2 coats of poly and it should look like new

They make tinted poly but it isn't recommended for floors. As the finish wears away, so does the color If you must go that route - make double sure you apply a coat or 2 of clear poly over it to give the tint some protection!
A satin finish will reflect less light than a gloss. That might take away some of the brightness.
 
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Old 12-21-09, 07:09 AM
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Thanks for the response!

I did another measurement for the top floors where i'm planning on laying the laminate. I measure at the end of the floors next to the staircase (http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y92/ddzc/ics004.jpg).

I measure from the plywood flush to the top 10mm. So it looks like I don't need additional plywood for this job. How thick is the foam underlay usually? Should I be buying 8mm laminate with the foam underlay to make it flush? If I buy 10mm, wouldn't the foam underlay push it over the edge a bit?

Also, what is that click lock type of laminate called? Is there a certain name for it or is that how they're all made now?

Any suggestions would be appreciated, thanks
 
  #13  
Old 12-22-09, 03:26 AM
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I don't think I would reduce the size of my flooring to accommodate the foam. I would opt for a transition piece and have the main part of the floor "feel" solid, as it probably wouldn't with a thinner flooring. The floor needs to move, so you don't want to jam it up to the top tread, anyway, so a transition piece may be necessary anyway to hide the space. I'll have to admit, I make all my own transitions in my shop, as it seems every application I need one in, there is nothing off the shelf that will work.
The click lock flooring is named several names, but are indicative to the application. Clik-lok, I believe is an Armstrong brand, but others have their own. With the advent of this type flooring, I don't see why anyone would use the glue up type, but to each his own. You can apply an entire room of click lock type flooring in an afternoon, after proper preparation. It will take you longer to cut the trim than to lay the floor.
Good luck, and holler back if you need more information.
 
  #14  
Old 01-28-10, 06:32 AM
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Hi Chandler and everyone,

I really pushed this project, but last night I kicked myself and ripped out all the carpet. Took me about 2 1/2 hours on my own.

Now here is the thing I ran across...the sub flooring to the baseboards vary all over the place! This makes me confused on how thick of a laminate I should buy. I'm assuming I don't have to purchase additional plywood, correct? Basically I took a few measurements from the plywood to the baseboards and here are 3 basic numbers I came across:

1/4 inch-6.35mm
3/8 inch-9.5mm
1/2 inch-12.7mm

I need to buy the material in the next day or two. What size thickness should I be getting?

Thanks
 

Last edited by ddzczc; 01-28-10 at 08:08 AM.
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Old 01-28-10, 07:14 PM
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Is the flooring level? It can be level and the baseboards can be a little off. Once the laminate is installed it will take up some of that space. You will be installing shoe molding on top of the laminate, and attached to the baseboard only which will hide any aberrations in the baseboards.
Now, back to the basic question, is the floor level? Use a 10' straight piece of lumber with a level on top of it to get a good overall picture, laterally and diagonally.
Remember the laminate will probably take up 3/8 of an inch including the underlayment, so even a 1/2" gap will be covered by the shoe molding without a problem.
Let us know if this wasn't clear.
 
  #16  
Old 01-29-10, 08:16 AM
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Originally Posted by chandler View Post
Is the flooring level? It can be level and the baseboards can be a little off. Once the laminate is installed it will take up some of that space. You will be installing shoe molding on top of the laminate, and attached to the baseboard only which will hide any aberrations in the baseboards.
Now, back to the basic question, is the floor level? Use a 10' straight piece of lumber with a level on top of it to get a good overall picture, laterally and diagonally.
Remember the laminate will probably take up 3/8 of an inch including the underlayment, so even a 1/2" gap will be covered by the shoe molding without a problem.
Let us know if this wasn't clear.
Hi Chandler. I'll check out the flooring tonight with a level. I didn't know about the shoe moldings and it looks like that solves my confusions b/c it just hides any possible gaps left over. When laminate is installed, is it installed in parallel with the baseboard or does it tuck underneath? Also, with my current setup, I can use any laminate thickness, correct? I was leaning towards the 12.3mm pieces.

Thanks again.
 
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