Sloping floor

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Old 11-09-09, 03:18 PM
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Sloping floor

I posted about this awhile back with a different solution in mind but I've since taken another look and want to start from scratch.
I've got an older house (1916) where the main floor slopes. It's fairly even for most of its length but for the last six feet it slopes toward the front door. In that six feet it drops about 2 1/2" fairly evenly across the length of the room. You can see basically the same slope at the line where the wall meets the ceiling as well. Looking in the basement there are a few jacks throughout but I don't notice the slope down there.
Anyway, I'd like to put in a new floor. I'm wondering what the first step is. I don't want to mess with actually raising the floor as I've heard it can cause all sorts of trouble with cracking walls and the like. I feel like the house must be fairly well settled and don't expect it to drop any more. Where do I start on something like this? Also, since it does slope toward the front door, I suppose I'll have to raise it. Is that going to be as difficult as it sounds?
 
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Old 11-10-09, 08:01 AM
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What type flooring do you plan on installing? If hardwood or laminate, you're stuck. Without correcting the ski slope, the flooring won't fit, and will probably crack and break at the beginning of the slope.
 
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Old 11-10-09, 05:38 PM
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I do want to correct the slope. I'm just looking for the best way to do it. Then I'd probably like to put in a laminate.
 
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Old 11-10-09, 06:27 PM
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I was going by "I don't want to mess with actually raising the floor as I've heard it can cause all sorts of trouble with cracking walls and the like."
It sounds as if the support for an entire wall has sunk, since it seems to have sunk evenly for that much of a drop (and it is a lot!). A structural engineer that can see what you have would give the best advice as to how it should be corrected. Sometimes it entails pouring new footings along the wall and introducing new support means. BUT it has to be done slowly to prevent those things you fear most. Sorry I couldn't give a more definitive answer, but you can see what you have, and we can't. That is why I suggested bringing in the big guns.
 
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Old 11-11-09, 10:03 AM
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Is it possible that I can even the floor out without actually raising it from the basement?
 
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Old 11-11-09, 02:31 PM
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I thought about it before I posted, but 2 1/2" correction in the room would throw off door openings, trim moldings, just about everything on that wall. I contemplated suggesting installing tapered sleepers and plywood, but that just wouldn't look right along the wall. That is why I suggested solving the problem, rather than putting a bandaid on a heart transplant.
 
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