Removing Tar paper reminents *PIC*

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Old 02-09-10, 10:17 PM
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Removing Tar paper reminents *PIC*

Recently took up a floor and wanting to refinish my existing floor. I got a lot of paper stuck to the floor. The heat gun and scrapping is going to take FOREVER. Drum sanders would go through $100 worth of sandpaper every 2 passes.

Someone have an easier way to get this crap off?


Starting to think I'm better off to tile.

http://img44.imageshack.us/img44/2294/floorq.jpg
 
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Old 02-10-10, 06:13 AM
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Mineral spirits should help to dissolve the adhesive but care must be used - both from fumes and it's flammable

Anyway you tackle it - it won't be an easy job
 
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Old 02-10-10, 07:42 AM
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Originally Posted by marksr View Post
Mineral spirits should help to dissolve the adhesive but care must be used - both from fumes and it's flammable

Anyway you tackle it - it won't be an easy job
thanks for your response Mark. I think I am going to have to sacrifice the wood floors and go with tile, which isn't what I wanted but I just don't have 2 weeks of scrapping in me anymore
 
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Old 02-10-10, 11:17 AM
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That's a mess!

I would go with prefinished engineered hardwood or 1/4 backer board and tile. For the tar paper to be in that shape you probably would have some water damage on your existing or have to sand to much off to get it looking great anyway. Kind of hard to tell in that pic. the issues here are a height difference. maybe even some schluter tile membrane that would reduce your height difference to about 11/16.
 
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Old 02-10-10, 02:55 PM
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I had the same problem after ripping up 30 year old linoleum over oak hardwood, the vinyl came up but the adhesive and tarpaper stayed. What I ended up doing was going to our local rental place and renting a steamer, still slow going but faster than the method you are using. The steam did not put too much water in the wood, I kept wiping up any puddles that happened. The steam will heat up the glue and dissolve the paper and when you get it right it will just easily scrape off. Just be careful not to dig into the wood. Any glue that remains just hit it again with the steamer, it melts. This might not be the perfect way of doing it but it worked, I did a 15' by 17' kitchen and a hallway and bathroom in a weekend. I still need to resand and refinish it but that will have to wait for now. If you have any questions just ask.
 
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Old 02-11-10, 02:34 PM
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Originally Posted by Floor_me View Post
I would go with prefinished engineered hardwood or 1/4 backer board and tile. For the tar paper to be in that shape you probably would have some water damage on your existing or have to sand to much off to get it looking great anyway. Kind of hard to tell in that pic. the issues here are a height difference. maybe even some schluter tile membrane that would reduce your height difference to about 11/16.
from what I can see I can't see any water damage, but then again I can't see much. I want to stay away from eng hardwood b/c my entire house is hardwood (minus bathrooms - tile) and I'm not a fan of 2 woods meeting and not matching.

Thanks for bringing up the heigh difference, I never thought of it since this is hardwood rather than a subfloor. The floor isn't PERFECTLY level but it is pretty damn level. What shall I put down under the backerboard? Is there anything I can do to get it a little more level?

Thanks
 
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Old 02-11-10, 03:48 PM
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The cement board is screwed down in a bed of thinset which will help to level it out. It's hard to get anything in construction perfect, the illusion of perfection is the next best thing
 
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Old 02-11-10, 03:50 PM
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Originally Posted by marksr View Post
The cement board is screwed down in a bed of thinset which will help to level it out. It's hard to get anything in construction perfect, the illusion of perfection is the next best thing
thanks again for your response mark... do I need to prime the wood/tar before putting down the thinset for the backerboard?
 
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Old 02-11-10, 03:59 PM
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I'm a painter, not a tile guy but I think they either use an additive to the thinset or use a thinset that already has the additive. As far as I know, no primer is used on the floor - least ways nobody's ever asked me to prime the floor prior to tile/wonder board
 
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Old 02-11-10, 04:58 PM
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I wanted to add that the steamer did not warp the boards at all. The little area in your pic could be done easily in an afternoon. Your choice of course. I just like the look of wood and where we live tile is too cold on the feet.
 
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Old 02-13-10, 04:49 PM
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Originally Posted by 5dollaralien View Post
I wanted to add that the steamer did not warp the boards at all. The little area in your pic could be done easily in an afternoon. Your choice of course. I just like the look of wood and where we live tile is too cold on the feet.
what kind of steamer are you talking about? anyway to link one up for me? I would prefer the hardwood as well as it'd be cheaper to refinish than to lay underlayment and tile.

Thanks
 
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Old 02-15-10, 03:26 AM
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check with your local rental place. it was an industrial steamer, bigger than an average home steamer
it will melt that stuff, it seems to heat up the adhesive to where you can just scrape it off. then any glue left just hit it with the steam again and scrape/wipe it up. Now you have to be careful as the steam can soften the top layer of wood and make it easy to gouge the wood. But don't worry it does not take long to learn how it works.
I tried my wifes clothes steamer first out of desperation cause nothing else worked. And I found out that it wanted to work but just not fast enough, so I thought if I had something bigger it might work and it did.
I think it cost me 35.00 for a day and I rented it on Fri. evening for Sat. and Sun was free.
good luck
 
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