soft wood floors

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Old 03-15-00, 12:11 PM
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hello y'all,

to get rid of a horrible cheap blue carpet in the kitchen and eating area (and to save a little money) we are thinking of going down to the sub-flooring and re-finishing that if it looks decent enough. In any event it will save on the installation of real lino which is our other choice...

We believe the sub-flooring is a soft wood, probably fir. We don't mind a rustic look. In fact the walls will be painted with home made milk paint.

Does the floor have to be sanded? What do you all reccomend for finishing the floor? We would like the boards to be a dark color to contrast with existing oak flooring in the rest of the house. I would be curious if anyone out there has any experience, tips, horror stories, etc about working with a soft wood floor.

best regards
Scott Gibbs
 
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Old 03-15-00, 03:10 PM
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I'm no flooring pro, but I would think that it would not be a good idea to just go with a subfloor, especially softwood plank subflooring. The boards will swell/shrink, leaving gaps, and also you would not have a moisture barrier. I would definitely consult a flooring expert or building contractor before going that route.
 
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Old 03-16-00, 04:12 AM
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Believe me, you do not want to finish off your sub flooring. That is the flooring under your regular floor, thats why they call it sub flooring. If you do not want to install a new wood floor, then put down what is called Laun board over your sub flooring.
It is about 1/8 to 1/4" thick, very slick on one side and is what is used to put vinyl flooring down on.

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Old 03-16-00, 06:41 PM
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I bet that you could still find some good Pine flooring!

Put it down either cross grain to your room or 90 degrees to the subfloor.

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Old 03-17-00, 02:07 PM
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hello gentlemen,

I am stubborn and stupid not to mention being from Missouri. Only one of you guys offered real reasons why it can't be done...

Regarding the moisture barrier issue... If there is a vapor barrier in the insulation directly under the sub-floor or poly at the bottom of the crawl space is this still a big issue?

Regarding the shrinking and swelling... this is mostly caused by variations in temperature right? Since I live in Northern California it seems like this would be less of an issue. In any event I guess it would steer me away from the urethane style finishes...

I used to work with luan in set construction and I can't imagine why I would put it on my floor even as an under layment. If we do go with linoleum all the people we have talked to have been specifying fairly high grade plywood.

best regards
Scott Gibbs

 
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Old 03-18-00, 11:25 AM
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You should place 15# felt over the current subfloor. This will seal out infiltration from below.

Next put down 1/4" lauan with screws. Use a floor leveler to smooth all the seams and screws (just like drywall).

Then a linoleum can go down. Anything less than this is not good work. Seems and gaps will show and crack the flooring.

Subfloor is just that (it goes UNDER another floor - lauan). Your current sub-floor is probably only 3/4" pine - or fir as you think. It was never meant to be the finished floor. Note the irregular gaps between boards.

You could finish the floor with a T&G pine or oak floor and place the boards as I have earlier suggested.

It is your house and you can do as you wish, but you came for advice.

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Home repair & Construction

"Where the character and work are always upright"
 
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