Temporary laminate & sheathing over hardwood?


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Old 07-10-10, 04:07 AM
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Temporary laminate & sheathing over hardwood?

Hello!

I have an old hardwood floor in half my downstairs, about 200 sf. The dining room is nice & flat. It flows into the kitchen which is very damaged and bumpy. I am selling the house and don't have the time/money/expertise to refinish/repair the hardwood.

It's a small house so for max. aesthetics & flow I'd like to have the same flooring in both areas.

I was wondering if theres a way to sheath over all the hardwood (to prepare for laminate) without putting a million screws into the diningroom.

The kitchen is beyond repair so I can screw a sub-floor in there no problem. My thought is that the next owner of the house may want to restore the diningroom floor.

I hope that all made sense!!
 
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Old 07-12-10, 01:34 PM
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Others may have different opinions but if you're just looking to pretty things up so it will sell - can you remove the flooring in the kitchen, lay down the sheathing in the kitchen to match the height of the existing dining room wood floor and then lay you laminate on top of it all?

To get the laminate to lay correctly you'd have to remove all the bumps in kitchen anyway, so why not just rip that floor out. There's no addtional material cost to ripping it out and you'd be using less sheating since you're only doing the one room.
 
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Old 07-12-10, 04:44 PM
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Hi njnorsky! Thanks for the response, I hadn't thought of that. The only thing that worries me is that taking out the hardwood may open up a whole n'other can of worms....

What do you think of this: for the diningroom underlay use a nail gun and maybe some construction adhesive (just a dab every few feet)? The floor is pretty flat so I don't think the nails would pop out or anything. Then the next owners would just have to contend with small nail holes and some glue spots, should they decide to re-finish the floor?

I truly appreciate your advice. Thanks again!
 
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Old 07-13-10, 10:32 AM
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I can appreciate what you're trying to do. Having a consistent floor covering thru connecting rooms/spaces does help create an illusion of a larger space since your eyes are not distracted by different floor types or surfaces. I did it myself to my own home a couple of years ago - LR/DR/Kit now all have hardwood vs tile in the Kit, carpet A in the LR and carpet B in the DR.

Is this really going to be a deal breaker in trying to sell your home? Are the dollars you put into this going to be returned to you when you sell? Stop worrying about the next owner.

What's covering the floors in the 'other half', carpet? How old is it and is there hardwood under it? If so I'd pull the carpet out of there, refinish to match the dining room and then put a new floor, either wood/tile/linoleum in the kitchen? As stated before it sounds like no matter what you do you're going to have to deal with fixing the bumpy kitchen floor first - if you choose to do anything at all. (Keep in mind any changes to the floor height may impact the ability to get a fridge or a dishwasher out of or into its spot.)
 
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Old 07-13-10, 12:55 PM
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Stop worrying about the next owner.
I think you are on to something there!

I guess I didn't want to wreck the floor in the diningroom because people so cherish original hardwood floors.

The kitchen did have several layers of old flooring. I tore them out, now it's hardwood but rotten in spots, gapped, bumpy and covered in black glue.

I guess I need to do the math: rent a sander, buy stain, polyurethane, sandpaper for the diningroom, flooring & sheathing for the kitchen. Compare that to cheap laminate, foam & and 1/4" OSB underlay for both areas.

I think I may need to put it on the back burner for a few weeks. Thank you for the encouragement and food for thought!
 
 

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