1x12's

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  #1  
Old 08-26-10, 12:12 PM
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1x12's

Hello, I've got 14....... 28 foot long heart pine 1x12's that I would like to put down over a stained concrete floor.
We will leave them just as they are. They were the floor boards out of my wife's grandmothers house ( over 100 years old).
They will be the living room area of large living / kitchen/ dining room.
any idea's would be appreciated.
Thanks
 
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Old 08-26-10, 04:18 PM
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Placing them directly over concrete may not work. How will you attach them? Better yet, what will you attach them to? I would crave that type wood. Have you thought of using it for one of your walls, rather than a floor. It would be a great conversation piece and would make the basement more "homey" looking. Just a thought.
 
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Old 08-26-10, 05:27 PM
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Those are actually very valuable pieces of wood, especially in that quantity. My concern would be the moisture from the concrete. Moist on one side and dry on the other would mean cupping.

Is this a basement or slab home? Unless the concrete was put down with special measures to prevent moisture, which few are, you would need more than just wood over the concrete.

Bud
 
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Old 08-26-10, 06:54 PM
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Actually I have not even begun to pour.
I have some more for the walls.
What should I do to ensure no moisture. And how should I attach?I thought about black 30lb felt just under boards.
maybe good plastic in slab.
Slab home
 
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Old 08-27-10, 03:55 AM
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As Bud said, the value of the boards may not be realized if you place them as flooring directly on concrete. They aren't engineered to be floor boards, so cupping and splitting will be a predominant problem, no matter what you try to do to eliminate the moisture. Working with wood I cringe to think you would use them as flooring. I would drool all over the wood just to have it for special purposes. They are very valuable if in good shape, which I am sure they are.
 
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Old 08-27-10, 07:04 AM
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Well I hear what yaw r saying but my wife wants her grandchildren to b able to walk on the same boards her grandmother walked on at that same age.I said it was her grandmothers house ; but it was actually her g grandmother.
We dismantled the ole house back in 97, and I've had them all stacked in a barn ( off the ground).I have enough of the rest of the house to cover around a 1000 sq ft of walls.
She's pretty determined; ifyouknowwhatimean.
Still in the planning stage
 
  #7  
Old 08-27-10, 09:07 AM
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There are sub-floor materials that people use with laminate flooring over concrete. It creates an air gap and places your new floor on a wood surface.

Bud
 
  #8  
Old 08-29-10, 11:21 PM
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This is how it would be done:

You cannot install a 1" solid wood floor directly onto concrete. You have to attach it to a 3/4" plywood or OSB. So if you have the option to pour your own slab this makes it easier. Because you can plan for your floor to be 1 3/4" tall and work around it.
1. pour the floor but use a moisture barrier under the concrete to prevent moisture from coming up.
2. After 90 days (minimum) test the concrete to get the moisture vapor emission rate. you need to know that the slab is dry enough to lay a wood floor on top of it.
3. lay proper felt paper or vapor barrier over the concrete, then 3/4" plywood or OSB (this can be floated and does not need to be adhered, screwed, nailed to the floor) It does need to be properly spaced from the walls and eachother. 3/4" from the walls and 1/16" from eachother. They should also be installed on a diagonal.
4. Now your wood floor can be nailed to the newly layed subfloor.
5. Maintain it the right way- keep the environment a stable temperature and consistant relative humidity. That floor will last forever.

This information is from the NWFA installation guidlines. NWFA.org can get you in touch with a wood expert in your area. Spending a few hundred bucks to hire someone as a consultant is definitely worth not messing up your family heirloom.
 
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Old 08-30-10, 04:04 PM
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You can put it down. Don't expect good results (sincerely hope you do have good results), and think about when you sell the house. Whatcha gonna do?? It may help sell it, but it's your grandmother's floor.
 
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Old 08-30-10, 08:16 PM
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The minimal wait to put any flooring on a slab is 28 days per inch of thickness. So a 4" thick slab should set a minimum of 112 days and then still needs to be moisture tested.
 
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Old 08-31-10, 02:31 PM
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Originally Posted by sam floor View Post
The minimal wait to put any flooring on a slab is 28 days per inch of thickness. So a 4" thick slab should set a minimum of 112 days and then still needs to be moisture tested.
Where is that standard found? 28 days per 1" That's the first i've heard of it being stated that way.
 
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Old 09-01-10, 08:47 AM
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I will not be in any hurry after slab is poured.
 
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Old 09-01-10, 05:55 PM
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Originally Posted by Arkon View Post
Where is that standard found? 28 days per 1" That's the first i've heard of it being stated that way.
Common consensus in the concrete trade. Also acknowleged by many flooring inspectors and an accepted standard in court cases.....http://www.cement.org/tech/cct_drying.asp
 
  #14  
Old 09-01-10, 10:00 PM
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Originally Posted by sam floor View Post
Common consensus in the concrete trade. Also acknowleged by many flooring inspectors and an accepted standard in court cases.....Concrete Technology | Drying of Concrete| Portland Cement Association (PCA)
I thought the ASTM F1869 standards stated 90 days minumum but i'm going off memory so i could be wrong. Thanks for the link- good site.
 
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