Wanting to change flooring in Kitchen but have question?

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Old 11-23-10, 11:36 AM
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Wanting to change flooring in Kitchen but have question?

I want to change the flooring in my Kitchen and into the dining room. Kitchen is currently lanolium and dining room is carpet. My bigest concern is the kitchen cabinets. will have to remove the cabinets to do hardwoods in the kitchen. Not looking to do a laminate what actual hardwoods probably 3/4". Thanks for any and all help
 
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Old 11-23-10, 11:44 AM
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I don't think you have to remove the cabinets but there will be a height difference, so that may make the decision for you
 
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Old 11-23-10, 02:18 PM
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The biggest issue with the kitchen would be if you have a dishwasher. The dishwasher more than likely won't fit under the counter top if you install flooring under it.... and it may not come out [for repairs or replacement] if you floor up to it
 
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Old 11-24-10, 02:29 PM
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Removing the cabinets will change a two day job that takes moderate skills and patience into a full scale renovation. Hardwood is really not meant to be installed under dishwashers and there is no benefit from doing so. You absolutely DO NOT have to remove the cabinets to install hardwood. If you have normally sized cabinets and a reasonably modern dishwasher, there should be know problem removing it in the future. To check this, remove the kick plate at the bottom front of the dishwasher. It is usually attached by two screws, one on each side, which are screwed through slots that allow height adjustment. In most cases, the linoleum extends under the dishwasher. If this is the case, once you remove the vinyl and its plywood underlayment in the rest of the kitchen, you will only have about a 3/8" difference between the top of the existing vinyl under the dishwasher and the top of the new hardwood adjoining it. The adjustable feet on the front of your dishwasher should have at least this amount of play if you need to remove it in the future.
 
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Old 11-28-10, 11:11 AM
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What IF, they have a BUILT IN refrig? One that is enclosed at the top as well. I would check on HOW it could be serviced.

A standard refrig that is on rollers, should of course be moved out and flooring installed under same. Some times the overhead cabinet is very close, so check on that as well.

Been there, done that,

Dale in Indy
 
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Old 11-30-10, 08:38 AM
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Have you guys ever installed the bella prefinished hardwood floors 3/4 in. Would be my first hardwood floor. Just talk to a couple other guys says its not problem at all to install?
 
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Old 11-30-10, 01:47 PM
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Acclimate it to the room temp and humidity for 72 hours, rent or buy a flooring stapler, buy a couple of boxes of staples, beg two good friends to help and you're on your way. Will you be changing directions at any point, or do you have any closets to tackle. If so, there are tricks we may let you in on, just ask.
 
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Old 12-03-10, 10:46 AM
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If this is a Lumber Liquidator's product, open a box and inspect it before you accept it. My cousin purchased 600 SF of wood from them for an amazingly low price. Amazing until we started working with it that is. Splits, unfilled cores and voids, checked and cracked finish, broken tongues...it was a nightmare. He had to purchase another 5 cartons (Approx. 100 SF) to make up for the boards that were uninstallable. Also, a better quality product tends to be milled at a slower pace. This means that the boards will be much more dimensionally true and will fit together without you having to bang the hell out of them. Some of the longer boards we installed would be slotted in on one end but bowed out two inches on the other end making for A LOT of extra work. I would be concerned that a novice installer would have real problems getting badly milled wood to look good. That being said, the floor looked good when we were finished, although I would never walk on it without shoes because of possible splinters, and I have never worked with their better quality products. As far as I know, their great. However, having shopped their pricing on better grades of wood, their prices don't seem any different than anybody else's. P.S. changing direction is not an issue for 3/4" nail down products because installation standards require that you install the wood perpendicular to the joists. This is not an option.
 
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Old 12-03-10, 01:41 PM
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Having installed a number of different kinds of floors, I would suggest paying the extra money for the Straight Grain/ Rift & Quartered wood. It usually has no banana boards, rarely splits and you don't need as big an expansion area on the ends. Also, better for a high traffic and possible water damage. Quartered wood expand nominally from side to side so you won't get those winter cracks that develops sometimes when the humidity goes down in the house. Also, lot less headaches for someone with limited experience and you can order in from any lumberyard.
 
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Old 12-03-10, 06:56 PM
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Staabc, joist directions change, so flooring direction changes. Those need to be addressed, so it is an option.
 
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Old 12-04-10, 01:17 PM
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True, I should have specified that the direction of the wood installation is not an option, it is a requirement. Many home owners get all wrapped up in which direction would "look best" not realizing that this is not something they need to worry about. I wanted to make sure ddworkm didn't think direction change was some kind of aesthetic choice as opposed to a requirement based on joist direction.
 
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Old 12-04-10, 01:48 PM
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Changing direction on nail down hardwood is an option, defying the grain of the joisting, depending on the strength of the cross sectioning of your subflooring, and its thickness. I have done it successfully on substantial subflooring, but always advise against it with only single layer subflooring.
 
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Old 12-08-10, 09:01 AM
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You guys are an absolute wealth of knowledge I thank you for the all the info. I am trying to take it all in and make sure i know what im getting myself into!!
 
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