Extending Existing Hardwood Floors


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Old 12-30-10, 12:52 PM
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Extending Existing Hardwood Floors

I have floating oak hardwood floors in about half of my first floor. I'm planning on getting rid of the existing carpet and thought it might be better to just go hardwood throughout, especially because I don't want carpet in my dining room. Currently the hardwood floor is terminated at the carpet with a trim piece (not sure what the technical name is). Pictures are below. My questions are:

1. To extend the floor, can I just pop the trim piece at the seam and start laying new planks? I'm guessing I'll have to slide out some existing pieces so I'm not attempting to butt seam.
2. How difficult will it be for me to find pre-finished flooring matches my existing floor. Are these things typically marked on the bottom so I can purchase the same brand?

Kitchen to Dining Room Transition:


Living Room Transition:


Living Room Closeup:
 
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Old 12-30-10, 01:15 PM
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I think you're going to have a very difficult time matching exactly, I'd leave the transition in place and just start again in the next room

Opinion only, others may disagree
 
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Old 12-30-10, 03:07 PM
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I agree with Mitch. If you removed the transition piece you'd also need to remove some of the flooring so your joints would be staggered. That's too much hassle even if you could get a perfect match.
 
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Old 12-30-10, 03:38 PM
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To make it look better and not like an "add on", change the direction of your flooring in the new room. You would need to still use a transition piece, but you'll never match the size, color, grain, tongue and groove configuration,etc. as an afterthought. You will need to possibly add subflooring in the new room, not sure. Check by pulling up some of your carpet adjacent to the wood and see if the subflooring is the same height.
 
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Old 12-30-10, 07:32 PM
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Height is close. Wood floor sits on top of vinyl (roll out style). Looks like they removed the vinyl before putting down the carpet.

If I opted to go with an entirely different floor, I imagine I'd still need a different transition piece. The current one is beveled and wouldn't butt nicely against a new floor.

I'm beginning to wonder if just replacing the carpet may be a bit less painless...
 
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Old 12-31-10, 05:30 AM
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With only the thickness of lino between the rooms, I would opt to turn the grain and buy a new transition piece. I'm not a carpet fan, so replacing it would be painless since someone else is doing it, but would you be as happy?
 
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Old 01-07-11, 08:06 PM
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Pretty sure I'm going to take the opposing grain strategy. Thanks for the tip!

Does anyone know of transition pieces that don't create a bump like T-moldings?

Also, I know this is totally a preference thing, but does anyone think it would look odd if I went with a completely different species and stain? Currently, I have oak that is stained with a pecan color, but I'm thinking about going with a harder wood to lessen the amount of nail scratches from my dogs.
 
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Old 01-08-11, 04:31 AM
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T moldings are used with laminate flooring, you can just turn a piece of flooring sideways with regular hardwood - you just need to pay special attention to your fitting to eliminate any gaps. More than likely that's how your current hardwood is done.

If you're going to switch colors/types of wood, a narrow hallway or door opening is the best place to do it. There will be some that prefer to have all the wood flooring consistent but you are the one that lives there
 
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Old 01-08-11, 06:29 AM
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If this is 3/4" nail down flooring, as Marksr said, you really don't need a transition piece. I have had to build up the groove side of the crossways piece to fit the tongue of the existing flooring slightly, and in your case it may not be too difficult. You can do the build up with a piece of wood strip that would not exceed the lift you need, jam the new starter piece on the tongues and nail it in place. You will have a slight transition, but so much better than a transition piece that caps on top of the flooring
 
 

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