Older Pergo laminate flooring issue

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  #1  
Old 02-21-11, 10:27 AM
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Question Older Pergo laminate flooring issue

So heres the deal: I had a small leak in my condo that managed to warp a few boards of my pergo laminate flooring a while back and am now attempting to sell my condo. The place in question is a bad spot right in the door frame and my entire place(1000 square feet) is done in this. I have no extra pieces and have been unable to find any of this brand anywhere(called Pergo directly even). Its the kind that has the glue and not the joints. Because of that its probably not gonna come up anywhere very easy and i might not be able to cut the flooring while down(at least i dont think thats possible) Any ideas on what to do? id rather not spend 5 grand plus putting in new flooring on all 1000 feet for 2 boards. Any input, ideas or anything could be apprieciated.

PS. I Also tried to warp it back which improved it but did not fix it.
 
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Old 02-21-11, 10:51 AM
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Well....I'd probably find some sort of thick rug which will conceal it, but thats me. It could be repaired by an experienced Pergo installer, but you'll never find older stuff...and it probably wouldn't be an exact match.

Would it be possible to remove a larger section and put in tile or a contrasting material sort of as an entry?
 
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Old 02-21-11, 11:03 AM
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Wish it was that simple. It's actually right in the doorway between the bedroom and living room, any kinda rug put there is gonna look pretty stupid and obvious that there is a problem.
 
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Old 02-21-11, 04:53 PM
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If I had a nickel for every time a customer looked at me like I was trying to pad the order when I suggested they buy one extra carton... The only thing that I can think of is to remove the floor in the bedroom and carefully, oh so carefully, try to salvage a couple of the pieces. Then just carpet the bedroom. (Approx. $2.00/SF installed for decent carpet) This could be done (I think) but would be very tricky and tedious. How much of the damage is in the living room and how much in the bedroom? Could carpeting the bedroom shrink the damaged spot by half or more? If so, you could cut the laminate at the door, install an end mold and solve most of the problem at a minimal cost. Plus you could advertise "Newly carpeted bedroom"!
 
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Old 02-22-11, 09:40 AM
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Anyone else?

I Agree i always keep an extra box just in case, but i moved into this place and they flooring was already down. Id prefer not to carpet(dont think its much of a selling feature these days) Ive actually got it back down on the floor(after warping it back the best i could) but there are gaps in the flooring where it happened(probably not completely straight) I was debating pulling some up in say the closet but i have a feeling since its the glued kind it would never come up properly.

Anyone ever tried to bring up the glued laminate flooring without doing damage?
 
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Old 02-22-11, 09:57 AM
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I'm assuming you mean its the edge glued Pergo (not glued to the subfloor)? I don't think thats going to come apart without damage. Seems like the repair procedure on those is to cut the damaged section out inside the seam, then plane down the good plank to the seam and use a special mini router or bit to cut a new groove and use a spline to join them together.
 
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Old 02-22-11, 10:03 AM
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Well its definately not glued to the subfloor. I believe it's the pergo floor that doesn't just snap together but there is glue in the groove. So im assuming there it no way to get that up without breaking it. Maybe i could use a stanley knife or something similar to cut a piece out from under say (the stove) and maybe remove the piece glued into the groove by melting the glue with some kinda hot gun?
 
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Old 02-23-11, 02:16 PM
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How large are the gaps? And what color is the floor? If the gaps are thin, say 1/16"-3/32", you may consider filling them with putty to match the color of the floor. This would work better with a dark or medium floor. If not, here is what you need to do for a plank replacement. 1) Find an area that you can remove that has full sized planks in it. Under the stove probably wouldn't work, I'm thinking bedroom closet. 2) Cut out full sized boards. This is going to be tricky because you won't be able to cut out and salvage full sized boards while they are on the floor. What you need to do is cut around the boards you want to try to save so that the piece you want to salvage comes up with pieces of the surrounding boards attached. Now that you can set the boards on a stable work surface, you need to trim up to the edge of the salvage board with a circular saw fitted with a laminate cutting blade. (You can also do this free hand on a table saw) I would nibble up to the seam leaving about 1/8"-1/16" of the old board remaining. Then, I would carefully trim off the remainder with a sharp utility knife. 3) Next, removing the damaged pieces: With a dremel or grinder (You probably won't be able to get a circular saw in that close to the door frame) I would cut out the center of the damage boards to about 1/8"-1/4" away from the surrounding boards. I would then carefully trim off the remainder to get nice clean edges. 4) If your'e still reading at this point, you now run into a problem. That is that plank replacements are intended to be done with fresh product. The standard way is to router a new groove into the existing flooring and slip the tongue of the new product into the new groove. Your salvaged pieces won't have tongues. Someone suggested using splines (these are thin strips which fit into a groove side, making it a tongue side) and routering a groove in both the existing and salvaged pieces. Even if the right sized splines and matching router bit are available, (these were specialty items sold by Pergo) this is definitely a job for a professional. The only other way I can see to attach the salvaged and existing boards would be to use 1/8" or thinner rigid metal or plastic to make tabs. I'm sure I'll get crap from the other posters for my hillbilly ideas, but here is the method I've devised in my fevered mind: 1) glue 2" x 4" tabs underneath the edge of the existing floor so that about half of the tab sticks out. 2)Make sure to use baddass epoxy glue and weigh down the floor while the glue sets. 3)Come back the next day and apply glue to the exposed tops of the tabs, carefully fit the salvaged pieces onto the tabs, shim them so the seams are tight, and weigh the new pieces down. 4)Maybe cut the foam underlayment out from under the tabs to help take up the extra height.
All this being said, I think the best you can hope for is to make it look better. Even in the best possible situation, I've never met an installer who would guarantee that a perimeter glue plank replacement would look perfect. Good luck, I hope this helps. I'm going to take a nap, just thinking about this problem has wiped me out.
 
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