Hardwood Reducer


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Old 04-05-11, 07:26 PM
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Hardwood Reducer

I am looking for some general info on a reducer.

I need to install one between my kitchen (ceramic tile) and the dining room (hardwood floor). The tile floor sits ~0.5 inches higher than the hardwood.

Is there a certain type of reducer to use here? All I seem to see at the hardware store is moulding, and I'm not sure if it can be used for this purpose. Or, I see transitions that appear to be for carpet only.

I am close to just putting down a strip of quarter round but I'm sure I'm missing lots of info. Thanks in advance.

Joe
 
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Old 04-05-11, 08:10 PM
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Walk to the back of any Home Depot or Lowes in the flooring dept. Your looking for a hard wood reducer. A much better way then a piece of 1/4 round. It will be about 1-1/2" wide and have a nice smooth taper to it.
 
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Old 04-08-11, 07:14 PM
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Thank you. I purchased one tonight.

Another question...the reducer is not quite thick enough to sit flat on the hardwood floor (the tile sits high). Should I glue it as level as possible and color-match caulk to use underneath the reducer?

Or is there a better way? At least the quarter round has thickness to it.
 
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Old 04-09-11, 06:35 AM
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I just completed what sounds like an identical project. All you need to do is glue the T portion to the gap between the tile and the wood floor and let the top of the T follow the change in height. I'm on my way out the door but will follow with a picture if you want one. Also, my web site is in redesign right now, so it will be a few days before pictures will be there. One point that worked in my favor is that our home is a log cabin, so attractive functional wins out over pretty in most instances. Nonetheless, the Boss can be awfully picky about such matters and this approach met with instant approval.
 
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Old 04-09-11, 12:16 PM
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It occurs to me that the threshold transition I puchased at Lowe's may be different from what you got. Mine was a kit consisting of a metal U-channel, a T cross section cover strip, and a couple of other pieces for closing the gap between the floor and the T if I wanted to have the top of the T to be level. Out of all that, the only thing I used was the T-section piece.




 
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Old 04-10-11, 06:09 AM
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Thanks for the reply. Your's definitely looks nice. How much higher was your tile sitting over the hardwood?

Our tile is black/white, so I'm considering using a metal transition.
 
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Old 04-10-11, 12:24 PM
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About 1/4", I guess. The 1/4" backer board was laid with thinset then screwed down. Then thinset and tile. That gives 1/4 + 1/4+ ~1/16 for 2 layers of thinset or about 9/16 compared to 3/8 for the wood floor. What I was after was an inclined transition that would cover both edges because both are a bit rough I didn't find a reducer that would do that.
 
 

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