Best tool for diagonal laminate cuts?

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  #1  
Old 04-11-11, 09:08 PM
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Best tool for diagonal laminate cuts?

This weekend I'm installing ~310 sq ft of Armstrong Grand illusions #l3024, a 12mm high gloss smooth finish product.

Seriously debating doing it as a diagonal install for that extra flare. Read a lot about it already.
Yes, planned for more scrap - wow it's a lot of cuts, ~175 if my math is right.
The boards are just under 5" wide.

What's the best tool for cutting the edge diagonals? I'd planned a miter saw w/ a good blade, but a buddy suggested a good jigsaw w/ a guide instead, to the cutting action is across rather than down on the super hard laminate layer.
If a jigsaw is it, what kind of blade? Or what about a table saw w/ angled jig?
 
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Old 04-12-11, 03:36 AM
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First and last cut only on each run on the angle installation. All others will be laid as if it never happened. You may get into some corners where you will have two angles, so be prepared. I would prefer a table saw with an aggressive carbide tipped blade. all your cuts will be under base and shoe molding
 
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Old 04-12-11, 05:24 AM
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Table saw or compound mitre saw, but not with a cource blade. Laminite blades use far more teeth. A cource blade will give you a rougher cut.
I'd never use a jig saw to try and get a straight cut on anything.
 
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Old 04-12-11, 08:20 AM
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My reasoning on the courser blade is it's longevity. A fine toothed blade will be trashed in a few cuts with nice cuts for a while. Then rag edges. The courser blade may not be as pretty of an edge, but it will outlast the finer toothed ones and the wood will be under molding.
 
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Old 04-12-11, 08:44 PM
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Chandler, what do you mean two angles? Just that there will be single boards with an opposing angle on both ends?
I assume that is inevitable in every corner.
I do have 1 outside corner in the room, that will be fun as it will end up being a V taken out of a board, that will have to be done via jigsaw I'm sure...

So, Miter saw is OK? done laminate face down?
Hm I better check the miter will cut all the way through/across, if my math is right, 45 deg across a 4.92" board is ~6.9".... a buddy has 12" miter, even that may not make it...
 
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Old 04-15-11, 02:54 PM
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I would use a chop saw with a laminate blade if it has enough travel to cut the piece in one pass. If not, I would use a table saw, again with a laminate blade. I would never "officially" recommend that you remove the safety shield from your table saw, stomp on it, burn it, and flush the ashes down the toilet, but, in my experience, the safest way to use a table saw to cut laminate is to wear tight fitting clothing, safety glasses, ear protection, and a dust mask, clear the blade of extraneous "safety" gear that just gets in the way, install the proper (sharp!) blade, and pay attention to what you're doing. The installers who taught me mark their cuts with a framing square and hand guide them through the table saw. You may want to use a miter guide because passing the piece through the blade without binding requires a bit of an acquired touch. A last word about the blade. A course blade is meant to pass cleanly through soft material. Used on the appropriate material, it should not give an inordinately course cut. It is not a safe option on dense, hard material, just because you're OK with a course cut. Unless, that is, you WANT to see laminate fly across the room. (Or into your face) Additionally, laminate blades are made of materials specifically designed to hold up to laminate. Course blades will not hold up to cutting high density materials, much less the aluminum oxide wear layer on this product.
 
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Old 04-15-11, 03:10 PM
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Big Orange sells a Ryobi laminate saw for about $150. Might fit the bill. Always good to tool up before a job. You could sell it after your project.
 
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