Pictures: what type of wood is my flooring?


  #1  
Old 06-19-11, 08:11 AM
B
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: USA
Posts: 19
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Pictures: what type of wood is my flooring?

Specifically, I'm looking for the species (red oak, maple, etc). This is a 16 year old hardwood floor which was already in place when I moved into the house 14 years ago. I'm thinking of putting in similar flooring in another room on the same floor. It is NOT continuous (there's a tiled hallway connecting the rooms), so an exact match is not necessary. The new floor just has to be similar enough that it won't appear out of place in the same house.

Is it possible to tell based on color and grain texture what type of flooring I have? I think it's red oak, but that's mostly because I know red oak is common and it doesn't look too dissimilar to the pictures I've seen of red oak floors.

Thanks.

View image: photo 1

View image: photo 2

View image: photo 3
 
  #2  
Old 06-19-11, 09:08 AM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 36,607
Upvotes: 0
Received 11 Upvotes on 10 Posts
It is red oak with possibly gunstock or a light walnut finish. Go to flooring stores and get (buy) samples of flooring in the color you think it is, and match them up, but I believe gunstock is the color.
 
  #3  
Old 06-19-11, 09:40 AM
E
Member
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Texas
Posts: 989
Upvotes: 0
Received 1 Upvote on 1 Post
If it is Gunstock it is for sure not a Bruce product based on the photos. I once installed 400 ft of their product with that color name, and it was darker, more redish brown shaded, and showed less grain. It does however look like a Bruce floor 'out of the box product'. Perhaps as chandler said, a light walnut.
 
  #4  
Old 06-19-11, 11:00 AM
B
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: USA
Posts: 19
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Thank you both for your responses. My floor does look a little like the gunstock red oak floors I've seen online, so I'll order some samples and compare. Equinox: may I ask what makes you think it is a Bruce product? I couldn't even tell that my floor was red oak, so I'm amazed that some people can distinguish between brands.

Based on the appearance of my flooring, is it possible to tell how much it likely cost? Whatever it is, I'm happy enough with it, so I'm not necessarily looking for something more expensive. I'm having a lot of trouble estimating the cost of my project (basically a 350 square feet bedroom with a plywood subfloor). I've been looking at 3/4" prefinished solid oak flooring more because that appears to be the "default" option than anything else. I'm open to DIY, but I'd need to buy the tools so I'm not sure how much I'd save vs going with a professional installer. Is $3-4 per square foot a reasonable guess for a professional installation? (Edit: I meant the cost of labor here. I imagine I'd pay around $4 per square foot for the wood itself, but I really have no idea.)
 
  #5  
Old 06-19-11, 10:59 PM
E
Member
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Texas
Posts: 989
Upvotes: 0
Received 1 Upvote on 1 Post
I wasn't saying it was a Bruce floor for sure, but based on just the finish it looked like it could be to me. There was alot of that product installed by some builders around the time your house was built also. There are more products available now than there were back then. If it is a Bruce product it is not their Gunstock color for sure based on my experience. Since this is a DIY forum I hope you would be encouraged to attempt the installation yourself, assuming you have access to a table saw, or miter saw. You can rent the nailer and compressor at most rental places including those in the big box stores, and those places also sell the proper U nails you will require. If you install the paper product under it you will also need a stapler. It is not a difficult job to install the floor once the first strips are lined up square, but it is physically demanding, and somewhat hard on your back if you are not used to bending over alot. You need to nail each plank at 8" intervals, and sort through the material as you go to keep consistent color and ensure you offset the joints using various lengths of material. If you do it yourself you are looking at 2 or 3 days of hard work, including cutting and nailing shoe molding, but your reward is in the finished product. I think you are in the ball bark around your estimated costs, but installers will likely add on extra for shoe molding, and you might anyway want to buy it and pre paint it so all they need to do is cut and nail it but they may still charge you extra for even that. You don't want to paint it after it is on if possible also other than to fill and touch up the nail holes. If you do decide to attempt the work, many here can provide you with more detailed information around the installation of the product also. Don't forget to also add in at least 5% scrap into your material calculation.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: