Opinions on sunroom threshold w/laminate

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  #1  
Old 07-27-11, 06:16 PM
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Opinions on sunroom threshold w/laminate

Hi Folks,

I'm on my *last row* of a kitchen/dining room install. Grandparent's thought it would be a good idea to install *carpet* in the kitchen. After 25years it was time to go.

Anyway, I need some sound advice on how to finish the junction to our sunroom. The doors which open to the sunroom are actually outdoor doors, but the sunroom has long been enclosed and conditioned.

One door hinges of the other, which is fixed (I think they call this a garden door?).

Pictures are worth more than my explanation, but there appears to be an inside piece of solid oak which serves as a transition to whatever flooring is in the house. The only thing I can think to do here is remove this 'transition strip', dato out the height of the laminate, and re-install.

My worry is that there won't be enough wood structure left in that piece to hold up to foot traffic. However that said, the adjustable-height threshold piece should be bearing most of the load - maybe it's as simple as cutting the entire bottom of that transition piece off (to clear the flooring), and attaching at the top only? Would glue and finish nails keep this from snapping off if stepped on? Sorry I'm not familiar with all the various components here.

I tried to capture where the floor would meet the existing trim strip in the below pictures.

Any thoughts?

Otherwise the install has gone great - this is my second laminate installation, and the Swiftlock Plus has held up great the past three years. I can't however say I'm all to pleased with the Pergo Max - same price, but the interlock system seems gimicky, only fully locks half the time, and is easily damaged. Eager (or not?) to see how well it holds up long-term.

Thanks for your time folks.
James

Transition piece in question - 'shoe trim' shaped (in other words, it attaches only to the side with a few screws, it does not lay on top of any other portion)


This is where the flooring lines up - if I route/dato out even 1/8" to recess the flooring, add expansion gap, there's not much material left.


How it all goes together:
 

Last edited by slipnfall; 07-27-11 at 06:31 PM.
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  #2  
Old 07-28-11, 03:55 AM
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Since your flooring will end flush with the threshold piece, I would just plane off the wood until it gave me a really good fit against it. I would not try to cut into the wood of the door frame. The woods match good enough in color and everyone knows it is a door, so there should be no complaints. I re-read the post and see it is "laminate" You won't be able to plane it down flush. Leave 1/2 - 3/4" gap in the doorway and install a flat transition piece, since the floor must have lateral movement area.
 
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Old 07-28-11, 05:31 PM
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Thanks for the response.

I'm not talking about cutting into the frame itself-there is a trim piece fixed to the bottom face of the frame via 5-6 countersunk screws. This was what I wanted to mod to create a recess for the floor to slidethe under (allowing for hidden expansion gap as noted). I just don't know how substantial this modified piece has to be to support foot traffic.

I think what I'll do is take some 1x oak and just make a custom threshold - wide/deep enough to have a 1/2 groove and still have material against the frame.

Still open to suggestions.
 
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Old 07-28-11, 06:08 PM
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I see the piece you are talking about, and it looks doable, but be careful as it may, as you indicate, thin the top too much for foot traffic. I always make my own thresholds. I hate the cheesy ones offered at the flooring and box stores. Glad you have the notion to do so.
 
  #5  
Old 07-28-11, 07:21 PM
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I don't *want* to take the more difficult route! Hah! If there was an off-the-shelf solution that didn't look wretched I'd do it.

This should give you a better idea of that trim piece. The proposed profile is below it. It's starting to look a lot like T-molding! I'm going to the store tomorrow to see if I can find a hardwood variant that I could simply trim down to suit.

I realize T-molding is supported from the 'leg' of the T (force is directed straight down), but I'm thinking that if the 'T' is supported on both sides, I shouldn't have to worry about snapping. The laminate will float beneith, but also prevent excessive deflection when walked on. We'll see.

I actually just realized my dato blade is long gone, so the easier, the better at this point. This one transition is holding up quite a bit now.

Best,
Jamie



 
  #6  
Old 07-30-11, 09:00 AM
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So I'm making some progress. I forgot I had a few long 1x pieces of oak.

Here's my solution:


Dry fit: figure I'll screw the bottom piece to the frame, and glue / face nail the top piece in after. At least I'll have a fighting chance of getting it out in one piece down the road this way.




Here's my new problem:


1/4" runout over 24". Perfect from there to the right, so it appears the subfloor is dropped a little to the left.

So I could possibly shave down the trim piece to make it match up, but you'll definitely see this difference in the door-sweep trim.

Or I could shim up the floating in this corner, but it may show up with the baseboard to the left of the door frame.

Any thoughts?

Thanks folks!
Jamie
 
  #7  
Old 07-30-11, 03:07 PM
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Jamie: priority time. My thoughts are to shave the left side of the bottom board to allow it all to blend with your flooring. It will still remain firm to your flooring. Your case trim will cover the end and unless you think the sweep thingy is that important, that's what I'd do. Of course you can shim the flooring, but you always run the risk of it cracking down the road since not all of it will be supported. BTW, good job and good fit!! You cheated, but that's ok. I would have been in the shop an extra hour making this one piece, but you got it good, don't worry. Screw the bottom piece into the subflooring and nail the top piece in. You may be surprised by the fit on the left side afterwards.
 
  #8  
Old 09-10-11, 08:46 PM
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Figured I could at least send along a picture or two of how it turned out.

All-in-all, I'm OK. It's sturdy, which is all I was really worried about. I mistakenly used a light wood filler for the nail holes, so they're a bit obvious, but oh well.

Thanks again everyone for the helpful thoughts and suggestions! I've tossed in a picture of the door trim-work (same room/project) which has been keeping me busy. I'll be beside myself once this room is finished!

Best,
J


 
  #9  
Old 09-10-11, 09:47 PM
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Very nice looking. Thanks for showing us how it came out.
 
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