Can I pin down a floating floor


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Old 07-28-11, 10:53 AM
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Can I pin down a floating floor

Hi, Please give me your opinion.
First, I know I will get a warning that it will void the warranty. But from what I read warranties on most floors become voided if you walk on the floor. Joking, of course, but they don't seem to mean much.
Question: I love my pinner. Very fine pins that hold things together and pins are easy to hide.
I am ordering Oak Toast click flooring that has a wire brushed grain. Very easy to cover or color scratches (or perhaps these pin holes).
I will install the click flooring over a very solid Parquet floor.
Can I pin the new planks down with 2-3 pins per board ?
I know the floor is supposed to float, but what's the difference. Floors are glued down and nailed down all the time.
I could pin the plank on top or in the click connector part. The pins are so fine that I could shoot it between the joints if needed.
 
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Old 07-28-11, 11:52 AM
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Welcome to the forums

Why do you want to pin the floor? Pins are not strong, they will likely not hold.
 
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Old 07-28-11, 12:25 PM
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Thanks Mitch,
Pins have a great gripping ability. They may not do well if you shear them, but as far as holding things together they are great. I have 5 nail guns and many types of nails, brads and pins to go with it. Pins would be my choice for this because they grip, yet if I had to remove a plank, I could, as long as I didn't use too many pins. It might correct the springy, fake feel that I have seen with many floating floors.
But I don't have the answer, just a question. If you could give me guidance how to make a floating floor seem solid that is my objective.
Why a floating room? So I can repair it when necessary. My relative glued an engineer floor together. When he tried to replace a damaged plank, repaired plank resulted in a major eyesore, and he is a first class woodworker.
And as crazy as it seems, when I build something I always keep in mine, "How can I take this apart if I need to?"
Thanks,
Bob
 
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Old 07-28-11, 04:14 PM
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I have the feeling you are going to do what you want no matter what, so why ask for opinions?

BTW:

pins are 23 gauge They do not hold worth a crap because they have no head.
brads are 18 gauge
finish nails are 15 or 16 gauge
 
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Old 07-28-11, 04:42 PM
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I'll have to jump on the bandwagon. A pin nailer won't hold flooring, period. So with that, we go on. What makes you think a click lock engineered floor won't feel solid? I install them all the time and they feel like a rock. The floor must expand and contract. "What's the difference"??? The difference in having a quality job and a cruddy one.
I also repair floors where there are bad gouges, water damage, etc. From 3/4" solid oak nailed down to engineered to laminate. They are all repairable if you know what you are doing.
If you're worried about taking the floor apart, then why would you nail it down?
I'll compare nail gun inventory with you any day, but I know when to use them and when to leave them in the trailer.
 
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Old 07-28-11, 06:20 PM
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Sorry, I offended you guys. I will drop my membership to this forum today.
 
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Old 07-28-11, 06:25 PM
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You haven't offended anyone. We give advice. When advice is not accepted, that's fine. Sometimes methods are tried and true. Most of us are professionals that try to help out on the forums in our spare time. We have the experience and know how and are just trying to keep people from themselves in certain instances. We look forward to your comments and questions.
 
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Old 07-28-11, 09:38 PM
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Yep, Chandler is exactly right. No one on this end is offended. Saving people from their own ideas is sometimes what happens here. And if my remarks were what you took offense to, I certainly apologize. We are very open to discussion, and yes as Chandler said, many of us are professionals (and yes we can sometimes be closed-minded about things) but often there is not much to discuss when you go contrary to mfg's instructions, which was at the basis of your premise.

We hope you continue to participate here and are receptive to the comments you receive, even when they may not be what you want to hear.
 
 

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