Questions Regarding A New Installation Of An Oak Strip Floor In A Hallway


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Old 10-03-11, 10:52 AM
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Questions Regarding A New Installation Of An Oak Strip Floor In A Hallway

I'm planning to replace the hall carpet with an oak strip floor and am considering doing the installation and finishing myself. The hall is T shaped and about 3 1/2 to 4 feet wide and starts off the foyer and runs to the bedrooms and main bathroom. I'm pretty handy and retired so I can take my time doing it but I have a few questions that I hopefully can find the answers to on this forum.

As I stated the hall is tee shaped with the longest portion being 10 foot. Since the floor joists run perpendicular to this portion I would lay the strip floor parallel to the walls on this portion of the hall. At the end of this hall, the hall then goes about 7 feet to the left and 7 feet to the right forming the Tee.

Since the floor needs to be installed uniformly and perpendicular to the joists, the strips on the portion forming the tee will be very short because they will go across the short width of the hallway.

1. Since you are suppose to sand the floor with the grain for both new installations and refinishing, how do I sand the hall floor that turns to the left and right at the end of the main portion. Obviously a large rental sander is too big to maneuver so what do I use to get that portion of the new floor sanded level and prepared for finishing?

2. Another question is how should I transition the hall floor into each bedroom which already have 3/4" oak strip floors? Is there a preferred or standard method for creating the threshold?

3. Lastly, where the strips from the hall go into the doorways to the bedrooms that have existing oak strip floors, do the flooring strips need to line up with each other? Does it need to be perfect or close? Or doesn't it matter?

Thanks for any help you can give me.

Dom
 
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Old 10-03-11, 12:19 PM
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Dom, have you considered prefinished oak flooring??? It will make your life so much more bearable. Unfinished wood, sanding, sanding, sanding, finishing, finishing...........plan on a while. With prefinished, install and enjoy. Transitions can be tricky, depending on the height. You can always use T transitions between the rooms at the doorways, and it may look great. I would try to match the wood up to the adjacent room as close as possible, even if you have to shave off an edge to make it work. No room (or hallway) is perfectly square, so some concession will need to be made.
 
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Old 10-03-11, 03:24 PM
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While site finished flooring might be a tad better than the prefinished, with prefinished there is no sanding dust!!! IMO it's the only way to go when installing hardwood in an occupied home.
 
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Old 10-06-11, 10:35 AM
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Thanks for the comments and suggestion of using prefinished floors. I will definitely consider and look into it.

With either unfinished or prefinished I still have a question about whether all the flooring strips should run the same way on both the main hall and the part that forms the tee?

Another question about prefinished 3/4" oak is whether it can be refinished the traditional way once it needs it?

I also wonder what will be the best way to fill in and match the nail holes where the prefinished floor has to be face nailed close to the walls?

Please keep the comments coming.
 
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Old 10-06-11, 02:56 PM
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Normally hardwood is run perpendicular to the floor joists. You can resand and refinish prefinished hardwood just as you can the unfinished. The prefinished shouldn't be confused with laminate which usually can't be refinished. Use colored putty to fill/hide the nail holes - just like you would with stained woodwork.
 
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Old 11-11-11, 01:30 PM
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The more I think about installing prefinished 3/4" oak flooring the more it makes sense.

Just wondering what brands are the best ones to buy, and which ones to stay away from due to quality and dimensional consistency issues?

I'll be looking to install 3/4" x 2 1/4" red oak flooring with a natural finish.

Thanks
 
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Old 11-11-11, 02:58 PM
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Most all the "better" brands are good. With any, however, you can get a "cabin" grade for lesser cost, but it will have more culls and boogers in it, so you may have to order a few more feet than necessary to accommodate that. Naturally you don't want to necessarily go with the cheapest, nor do you want to buy something mainly for the name. I think if you shop around and get reviews from reputable people and publications, you won't go wrong.
 
 

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