noisy/squeaky lamiante floors

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Old 12-27-11, 07:55 AM
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noisy/squeaky lamiante floors

Our kitchen floors are laminate and we have radiant floor heat.The floors are so noisy when walked on they drive us crazy.Not so bad in summer when heat is off.Is there anything that can be done for this without ripping up entire floor.I know we never put down a subfloor and when we bought our supplies to build our house they gave us OSB for the floors and before finishing the first floor of the house it ended up getting wet from a rain storm.I don't know if there is anything to fix this.I heard about this squeak ender kit but i'm not sure if this would help us.Anyone have any information about this kind of problem would be appreciated. Thanks!
 
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Old 12-27-11, 11:48 AM
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Squeaky laminate is normally caused when the material was installed without enough perimeter room to allow for expansion. The fact that the problem is more pronounced with the radiant heat activated would tend to verify the likelihood this could be the problem. Are there any places the floor seems to "bow up"? The squeak is normally the result of the joints where the boards are snapped together rubbing together. This should not happen if the material is flat and has the proper room to expand. Laminate also requires a pretty flat floor to perform at it's best. If there are too many voids between the laminate and sub-floor, squeaking can occur as the floor is walked on and the joints "work" when forced by the weight of traffic to flex into the voids. Was the flatness of the sub-floor verified before installation? As to the squeak-ender kit, Laminate is a floating floor and must not be fastened to the sub-floor. Those kits are normally comprised of some sort of fastener that is driven or screwed through the offending floor into the sub-floor which defeats the floating part of the laminate, only increasing the problems. It is possible the sub-floor is the offending party and not actually the laminate itself. Today's laminates can be uninstalled, for the most part, and reintalled. If the sub-floor turns out to be the problem, the laminate could be carefully uninstalled, the problem addressed, and the laminate reinstalled.
 
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Old 12-27-11, 12:15 PM
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Sweeping talcum powder into the joints can help but I agree with Smokey this sounds like an installation issue.
 
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Old 12-27-11, 03:02 PM
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Are your cabinets sitting on the laminate? I mention this since it is a new house.
 
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Old 12-30-11, 08:33 AM
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Yes the cabinets are sitting on the laminate.
 
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Old 12-30-11, 09:45 AM
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Laminate needs to move, it cannot when cabinets are sitting on it.
 
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Old 12-30-11, 10:14 AM
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Anyway to pull the molding and cut the laminate around the floor to let it expand?
 
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Old 12-30-11, 12:37 PM
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Yes. It's a total pain to do and very time consuming, but doable. As previously stated, laminate is a floating floor and needs to be free to do just that. I have a Bosch undercut saw that I use for just such a job as you're looking at. I lay it up to the toe kick and let the blade cut down, into the floor. Bear in mind, the wear surface of laminate flooring is very tough and will eat up a blade in a hurry so make sure you have plenty of extra blades on hand, whatever tool you use. I'm confident that my Bosch is not the only tool out there that will do the job and there will be some good suggestions coming up.
 
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