1 inch underlayment? Please help!

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Old 02-06-12, 07:17 AM
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1 inch underlayment? Please help!

New member here hoping for some advice. I am renovating my house and the floors throughout the 2 stories are sagging (its an old house so its normal, nothing structurally wrong). In the middle of the house is the kitchen, going from the back of the kitchen to the front of the kitchen, the floor slopes an inch and three quarters! Most of the dip happens within a 5 foot distance right by the back wall.

I need to do something with the floor, either vinyl tile, laminate or vinyl sheets BUT I would like to fix the slope a bit before I put a new floor on it. Here are some ideas:

- Half inch cork underlayment - only will give a half inch but its light weight. Run it until it is almost even with the higher end of the floor and then smooth out the connecting area with self leveling compound

- 1 inch plywood - will give a whole 1 inch, making the floor offset by only 1/2 to 3/4 inch BUT its going to be HEAVY. The area that needs covering is about 12' by 12'. That's a lot of weight, no? Again, use self leveling compound to smooth out the area where the new plywood evens out with the higher original end of the floor.

Both of these will give me a nice hard base for vinyl or laminate.

Are there any other solutions? Any better ideas? Suggestions?

Jacking up the floors or sistering joints is out the question.

Thanks!


BTW...floor that is there now is vinyl tiles. I plan on leaving them on and doing something over the existing floor.
 
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Old 02-06-12, 03:10 PM
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sagging (its an old house so its normal, nothing structurally wrong)
Hate to bust your bubble, but you may think it is normal, but it isn't. Sags in flooring are caused by lumber or footing failures. How long is the span of the room? Are there any supports below this area? Are there rooms below this area? Adding material to an already bad situation isn't going to make it right.
 
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Old 02-10-12, 10:46 AM
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Wow, an inch and a quarter over five feet. That's not normal settling. Hopefully you have access underneath, because it sounds like that's where the problem is. This may still be a DIY project if it's a failed beam or footing, but if its the foundation or sill plate, you're gonna need a pro. I would not ignore this. Its possible that this won't get worse, but I wouldn't count on it. By the way, how old is the house and what kind of foundation do you have?
 
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Old 02-10-12, 11:05 AM
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House is around 80 yrs old. The same dip is observed going from the front of the house to the middle of the house but over a much larger distance. Foundation is concrete. The same dip is observed from the attic, through the 2nd floor, to the 1st floor. The problem is the load bearing beam in the basement. It makes this dip from the stationary outside back wall to the 1st support columns. I assume the support column either settled/sank. Or...maybe the columns were never there, over the years the beam bent from not being supported at which point they put brick columns into place...who knows... I now installed 4 additional heavy duty metal columns for extra support. Ive owned the house for 5 yrs and the dip has stayed the same.
 
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Old 02-10-12, 02:17 PM
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Did you cut in footings for your support poles? Anything less than a sufficient footing for your local area will sink as the pressure is applied vertically.
 
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Old 02-10-12, 02:43 PM
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I did not cut into the basement floor. I put in 6 inch high, 12" by 12" concrete piers over the basement floor, then columns bolted on top of that. Column base is also 12 by 12.
 
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