Refinishing old pine floors

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  #1  
Old 06-25-12, 01:29 PM
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Refinishing old pine floors

We're in the process of remodeling an old farm house that was built (as far as we can date) in 1907. All the floor boards have been pulled up and put in our garage - subflooring needed work. At one point in time there was a rug down and they painted around the rug so some of the floor boards are just stained others painted white. We were told that the wood is old long leaf or heart pine -- not sure because I don't know anything about wood. In any case we were told it's worth replaning and refinishing by a friend. My question is now that its all up and we've decided everything should be planed -- should we plane then install and sand and stain -- in that order? Someone told us we could sand the individual pieces after we plane them before installation? What's the proper order to do this. Last but not least -- how can we be sure that this wood is worth planing and reinstallation? This will be a big job but we're not afraid of work.
 
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Old 06-25-12, 01:44 PM
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Welcome to the forums.

Plane, sand, stain and maybe a couple coats of polyurethane could all be done before installation and then apply a final coat or two of poly afterward.

All kinds of options here.
 
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Old 06-25-12, 03:35 PM
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The only thing that concerns me about prefinishing the wood is - will it all set even with little to no gaps?

How thick is the wood? how deep do you think you'll need to plane the wood to get a good consistent surface? Is there significantly more humidity in the garage than the rest of the house?
 
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Old 06-25-12, 09:49 PM
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You should not need to plane or remill a thing, unless you damaged the edges upon removal. Maybe hit the edges with sand paper if it is a beveled edge.

Install it and sand it down to bare wood. Planing and you are going to lose a lot of sandable wood.
 
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Old 06-25-12, 10:03 PM
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I would re-install it as is, and refinish it in place. And that doesn't include sanding. The paint and wax can be removed, and the finish can be restored with lacquer thinner and denatured alcohol, preserving the character acquired over the last century.
 
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Old 06-26-12, 07:37 AM
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Carpets Done Right --

Some of these floor boards are painted and we were concerned this wood gum up the sander? Also we're not sure that some of the boards may not have been stained and then painted over-- we had two floors and want to salvage enough to do the upstairs landing and hallway - downstairs living room and kitchen. Even discarding stained or bad pieces we will have plenty enough. -- So should we at least take off the paint -- and this might be lead based paint - probably is considering the age of the house. Thanks, Sharon
 

Last edited by seisenbarth; 06-26-12 at 07:39 AM. Reason: Additional Sentence
  #7  
Old 06-26-12, 07:41 AM
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What would be the best method to remove the paint?
 
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Old 06-26-12, 08:33 AM
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What would be the best method to remove the paint?
Check with the waste disposal jurisdiction for your area. In general, Using a gel stripper that holds the paint, and then putting the scraped-off mixture into special bag for collection is used. But check with the county (I'm guessing).
 
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Old 06-26-12, 02:26 PM
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You might want to get the paint tested first. While the walls and woodwork likely have lead based paint on them [although probably not the top layer] not knowing when the flooring was painted it would be hard to say without testing it. If the floor paint is only 30-40 yrs old - it's not likely to be lead based.
 
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