Applying Epoxy Flooring to Wood?

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  #1  
Old 08-20-12, 06:34 AM
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Applying Epoxy Flooring to Wood?

So, I am opening a business where I have wooden sub flooring and need to apply Epoxy to it. I want to try to do it myself as I am limited on money.

So I looked up if Epoxy can be applied to wood (as usually I know it can be applied to concrete, never heard of wood applications.)

Here is what I found:
1. Clean wood
2. Sand wood
3. Clean wood
4. Prime wood with an acrylic latex primer
5. Apply Epoxy

Now, this was intended for garage epoxy paint. I was thinking of using Rustoleum EpoxyShield for garages for this project.

Does anyone have any experience, and any knowledge on this. Will this work? Should I not be putting it on the sub flooring? Any other brand or different types of Epoxy that will work better? Cheaper?

Thanks!
 
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Old 08-20-12, 09:32 AM
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There are all types of epoxy coatings, I've applied epoxy on concrete, drywall, plaster, steel and wood - but not always the same type of epoxy.

Personally I'd go to your local paint store and ask them what options they have. Some epoxies are critical about what primer is used so it would be best not to prime before you decide on which epoxy to use. Other than that, your plan sounds good.
 
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Old 08-20-12, 09:50 AM
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I talked to Rustoleum, and they said Epoxy dries hard, wood, being somewhat soft, can flex and crack the epoxy. Is this true?

Does anyone else have suggestions for epoxy on a floor? I do not always trust what people working in a store say unless I know them. Online I can get multiple people's opinions.
 
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Old 08-20-12, 03:01 PM
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I have to ask.....why are you coating a subflooring? Rustoleum is correct in that their epoxies (and most) will crack on floors that flex. What is your joist spacing, joist size and length of unsupported span across the room? How thick is the subflooring?
 
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Old 08-20-12, 03:04 PM
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I suppose it depends on the thickness of the wood and the joist span whether or not it would be an issue. Back when I was still working and had any questions as to what coating would be the best for the job at hand - I asked the rep at the paint store. By paint store I mean a store that's main business is selling paint, not a paint dept in a bigger store. I've never used Rustoleum's epoxy.
 
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Old 08-20-12, 03:34 PM
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Hm... well, I am starting a retail store. The building is an old warehouse, with HUGE support beams and large planks for the floor. Over the old wood is like standard plywood. I am not sure joint spaces or whatever. Unsupported, I would consider all of it supported as the floor is SOLID as these were old warehouse buildings back when the city was a mill city for huge machinery as far as I am aware.

I saw a picture online where an epoxy company covered the wooden floor with epoxy, the sealed any joints or nail holes etc prior.

I am looking for an alternative to calling in a flooring specialist, however I am thinking this might be what is going to be needed to have it done right. Saving money is my goal.

Having an epoxy company come in is going run about $5-$6 per square foot, that will be about $10,000 with a 2,000 square foot space. I wish it was MUCH cheaper.

I choose Epoxy as I am simply looking for a simple, water proof, floor. I am not picky at all. Is there anything else out that that is low maintenance and water proof and CHEAP that either I could install easily, or have a company do it cheaply?
 
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Old 08-20-12, 03:44 PM
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I don't see any reason you can't diy painting the floor. There are many choices with epoxy probably being the most durable. You could also use an oil base porch and deck enamel. It doesn't dry as hard but will wear well. Any paint coating [including epoxy] is subject to wear in high traffic areas. Talk to the folks at one or two of your local paint stores - they should have several viable options for you.

Floor enamels are generally sold by the gallon, most epoxy's are sold by the 'kit' often 1 gallon of paint and 1 gallon of activator [some have 1 gal paint, 1qt activator] which gets mixed together and has a set work time. Any paint not used up after it is mixed, gets discarded - it can't be saved
 
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Old 08-20-12, 08:58 PM
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OK, I may swing by a paint shop and ask.

How hard is it to repaint the floor every few years after wear? Or will this depend on each product?
 
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Old 08-21-12, 03:33 AM
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How often to repaint depends on both the coating and the amount of traffic. The biggest issues with repainting the floor is removing what's on the floor [items for sale, etc] and the down time when the store would need to be closed.
 
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