Hardwood - Dark Stain

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  #1  
Old 08-27-12, 01:25 PM
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Hardwood - Dark Stain

Hello All - i have been reading various threads on this forum for months now - its been a massive help. So right now i have 2 floors (main and 1st floor) hardwood floors. It used to have carpet, but when we ripped it out we saw that there was unfinished oak wood under it. When we recently bought the house we had no idea about this, so we were pleasantly surprised. I was planning on putting a floating floor but now we are just finishing it off. Now here is the issue that i have.

A portion of the Hardwood was old and needed replacing. We called around and eventually got a company to come in, take it out and replace that section. They are also going to sand it and then stain it. Today i showed the contractor the color we liked again and he said he could quickly show us on oak what the color would look like. When he showed us, the stain was very light (we want a dark stain - not espresso but closer to that vs. brown). So he said that for him to get a dark stain, he would have to charge me more as he will have to do 2-3 coats of the stain and then do 2 coats of poly(not sure of the exact word). I was confused because i showed him this color before starting the project and he was fine with the color but now he wants to charge more. Is there a standard stain color which needs to be applied a few times to get the color we want or could he purchase a darker stain? I just want to make an informed decision and i thought who better to ask then the gurus on this forum.

Your help is greatly appreciated.

Tim
 
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Old 08-27-12, 01:28 PM
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Typically, only one coat of stain is applied because it seals the wood and subsequent coats do not soak in like stain is designed to do.

Based on what you've said, I would be running away from this contractor.

What did the other contractors you had bid the job have to say?
 
  #3  
Old 08-27-12, 01:33 PM
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Everyone said the same thing "It can be done once its sanded". I showed them the link and colored picture (below is the link of the finish we would love to get in the end). Do you know what mixture or stain would help us get this result? Would it be 1 coat of stain and 2 poly?

Thank you for your prompt response. much appreciated.

Kitchen - traditional - kitchen - minneapolis - by Stonewood, LLC
 
  #4  
Old 08-27-12, 03:45 PM
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While I stain a lot of woodwork and stair parts [including oak treads] I seldom do an entire floor but I've worked a lot of new residential construction and have seen quite a few oak floors finished that color [or close] It should only take 1 coat of stain! If the desired color can't be gotten straight off the shelf - it is custom tinted. Most any competent floor refinisher should be able to get the stain right in one coat. What color and brand is he using?

2 coats of poly is bare minimum for any floor job. 3 coats is preferred. After the stain is applied and dried, the 1st coat of poly is applied. Once it's dry, the floor is resanded [but not thru the poly] and the next coat is applied. repeat for the 3rd coat. Also ALL the sanding dust gets removed prior to any poly being applied.
 
  #5  
Old 08-27-12, 04:54 PM
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thanks Marksr. I just checked my contract and its "Sand refinish stain with 3 coats". Normally, do your clients show you what color they like and you provide samples of how it will look before you start the flooring? I just emailed the guy telling him that before he starts staining i need to sign off on the color etc. Didnt know if i was being too demanding.

Thank you so much for your help.
 
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Old 08-28-12, 04:26 AM
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Usually a customer will have already picked a stain color but occasionally they'll ask to match something that has already been stained and every now and then it will be a picture. If there is any question on the stain color, real life samples [scrap wood] are prepared first. If the customer doesn't like the samples, more work is done until the desired look is achieved. Because of the differences in each stick of wood, the entire floor won't be a perfect match to the sample but over all - it should be close.

Some customers are easier to work with than others but it all boils down to having a satisfied customer at the end of the job. If the customer isn't satisfied it hurts your reputation and a company's reputation is it's best selling tool. You are paying a lot of money to have the work done and it is more than reasonable for you to be satisfied with the end product.
 
  #7  
Old 08-28-12, 04:46 AM
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I totally agree. Thank you Marksr.
 
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