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Recommendation For Good Brand Of Engineered Flooring


mydog's Avatar
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09-21-12, 04:23 PM   #1  
Recommendation For Good Brand Of Engineered Flooring

I got burned on some carpet three years ago and regret the purchase-now I'm looking to have engineered hardwood (Oak) installed on my slab floor and I don't want to be burned again. I was looking at Pinnacle engineered flooring but the wear level looks a bit thin, probably 1.5mm and after searching the internet for 3 hours can't find out any definitive information on Pinnacle Engineered Flooring.

Does anyone have any experience wit a good brand of 3/8-1/2" engineered flooring? I've looked on internet websites like Lumber liquidators and can't find anything that would work. Ideas on manufacturers that are good?

 
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09-22-12, 06:40 AM   #2  
While the 3/8" may be more to your liking, a good 5/8" will feel more solid underfoot and will probably offer a good aluminum oxide coating for an excellent wear factor.

 
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09-22-12, 07:55 AM   #3  
Thank you for posting the information, the flooring has to fit under the baseboard trim and right now with some other engineering flooring there is a gap so I'll look into the 5/8.

After I posted the original topic I realized that perhaps a brand cannot be recommended due to board rules.

 
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09-22-12, 07:13 PM   #4  
You don't necessarily have to push the flooring under the baseboard. In fact, I wouldn't, and apply shoe molding after the flooring is down. You could do it with either the 3/8 or 5/8

 
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09-23-12, 02:22 PM   #5  
It's too bad they don't have a lot of 1/2" thick 4-5" planks (solid) but is is probably because they have a tendency to warp. I'm going to look into some thicker floors before I plunk the cash down on the counter.

I've seen expensive homes with 3/4" solid hardwood floors with a sort of "step up" moulding on the edges.

 
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09-28-12, 02:30 PM   #6  
OK, I've been looking at engineered flooring and they want to sell me HDF engineered vs several wood plies. I am concerned that the HDF type will not hold up since I've seen this type of material crumble and literally falls apart.
The salesman swore that the HDF is good material and would hold up in areas like a living room where there is very little chance of a washer flooding on it or flooding from a leak somewhere.

Would you as an expert in the flooring field recommend the HDF engineered flooring? Which would you prefer?

A lot is riding on your answer.

 
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09-28-12, 02:36 PM   #7  
Wow, no pressure, Larry

 
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09-28-12, 02:57 PM   #8  
I don't understand your post Mitch17, I'm not pressuring anyone, just desired an intelligent answer.

 
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09-29-12, 03:37 AM   #9  
A lot is riding on your answer.
Mydog, Mitch was referring to what my answer would be. We have a friendly forum and it's all part of the game.

I would go with multiple ply engineered flooring. I don't like anything that has basically no substance as MDF or in your case HDF. Mostly it is not recommended below grade anyway. In my experience with MDF type laminates, etc. you get a lot of damage in the snap lock area as it won't take much punishment from fitment. With the multiple ply flooring, it snaps together with authority and stays put. Hope that helps a little.

 
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09-29-12, 07:06 AM   #10  
Thank you Chandler for answering and I apologize to Mitch17 for my misunderstanding. I was thinking of ignoring the salesman's pitch for HDF but he was insistent that it was good material and would hold up. I'm going foe the MDF multiple layers and at least a 2mm wear level. Not that we'll wear it out and need to refinish but we're 68 years old and not rough on anything.

You folks on this forum have been very helpful over the years to me and aI appreciate your professional knowledge gained from years in the respective fields. Again, Mitch17, I apologize to you for my misunderstanding of your post. Keep on being friendly, the world needs more friendly people!

 
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09-30-12, 09:15 AM   #11  
No worries, we're all good here

 
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09-30-12, 06:43 PM   #12  
The Shaw flooring with the HDF core, is holding up better than I ever expected.
You do need to acclimate it good to the interiors ambient conditions.

The distressed and handscraped look is very popular

 
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10-01-12, 07:51 AM   #13  
You can look at Provenza, Gemwoods, Alston, Armstrong and many others. You will want an engineered wood flooring which the cross ply is usually birch. This is more dimensionally stable and correct and can contract and expand over your concrete. You will be looking at a 7/16" which is roughly a 1/2" about a 1mm and a half shy. You will need to put down a moisture barrier over the concrete like a 2 part epoxy then glue it down with a urethane adhesive, Or use Bostiks V-Lock, Franklin's Tight Bond or Sika urethane glue. Your finish should be a polyrethane/aluminum oxide coating with a UV cure. Don't worry about baseboards unless you will get new ones, you have to leave an expansion gap that will be covered with MDF quarter rounds, or new base boards if you get new ones. You will undercut the door jambs with an undercut saw to slide your material under. If you decide to float your floor,you will use vapor paper and the manufacturer's underlayment. Hope this helps.

 
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10-01-12, 07:57 AM   #14  
I thank you for the indepth answer, today we're going to look at flooring and see what is out there.
Thank you so much!

 
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