transition from floating laminate floor to laminate stairs

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Old 10-03-12, 01:37 PM
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transition from floating laminate floor to laminate stairs

Hi, I am in the planning phase of replacing the floor in my house which is currently a mix of laminate and carpet. The goal ist to have laminate flooring throughout including on the stairs. I did lay laminate a long time ago when it was still necessary to strap it together and glue everything, so I think this should be a lot easier these days. However, I never did stairs before and already did some reading and searching in this forum as well and I think I am pretty square on how to do the stairs itself (may have questions later, who knows). The rooms are all pretty long and if I lay the laminate along the light that falls into the room and along the longest walls in the room, then I it will be perpendicular to the stairs - I could change that if it makes a difference.

I am generally a bit confused about the transition of the floating floor to the stairs:

1) I have one stair going down and as said above I think I will probablye end up having the laminate planks perpendicular to the top step. As the floor is floating anyway, I think the only way to solve this is with an overlap stair nose. Is this correct?

2) The other stair is going up. Again I will most likely end up with the laminate going in the wrong direction. Do you then just to something like a quarterround on the bottom of the last step to bridge the gap? Or how is this typically solved?

Thanks for any advice,
Alex

PS: I am not a native English speaker, so I hope I was clear in the description above.
 
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Old 10-03-12, 01:41 PM
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Alex:

Welcome to the forums. While I cannot comment on your actual question, I wanted to respond to your comment about not being a native English speaker - your description was good as well as your grammar and syntax, you seem to have done very well mastering this not so easy language.
 
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Old 10-05-12, 05:43 PM
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Thank you, I have been in the US a couple of years now, but especially when searching for things in home improvement stores I realize that I am missing a lot of vocabulary.

But I do already have one more question:

3) My current stairs are carpet. The step design itself is simple, no nose or something, so it should be easy to get the stairnose on and so forth. The stairs have walls on both sides. How do you ensure the steps are flush with the wall? Is it just a matter of accuracy (assuming the walls are straight) or is there again a best of practice technique to bridge a possible gap? E.g. a white quarterround up to the beginning of the stairnose?
 
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Old 10-05-12, 06:30 PM
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I'll tackle 3 first. Yes, it is accuracy measured in the angle from the back of the riser to the edge of the steps. I use a framing square and lay it against the riser and note any difference in squareness, and transfer that to my tread.

As to laminate stairs, I have never seen it successfully done. You need a bullnose stair tread that will take the punishment of being stepped on. Laminate will crush too easily. I am attaching a picture that may help you decide on what to do with the steps.

Excuse the poor phone pix, but here's what you can do, in different shades and colors, and even type of wood;;
 
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Old 10-06-12, 12:18 PM
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Hi, thanks for the reply. The durability of the stair nose was my brother's concern, too, but I heard there are now aluminium stair noses which just have a laminate look-a-like coating.
The stairs in your picture have a board on the wall going diagonally down. That is something I do not have, my current stairs are just carpet which ends at the bare wall, there is no baseboard on the steps or anything. Is such a board a necessary preparation for laminate or wood? Or can the laminate/wood be flush against a wall?
That is why I was asking how to compensate for uneven walls and I imaged a quarterround for example like seen in the upper part of your image, could help.
 
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Old 10-07-12, 04:07 AM
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The board on the side is called a skirt board and mainly keeps your feet from poking holes in the sheetrock. I just finished another one Friday where there was no skirt board present. The staircase was only 31" wide, and installing a skirtboard would have made the steps too narrow (as if they weren't already) Skirtboard isn't absolutely necessary, just makes it look good. Your steps can be flush against the wall. Make accurate cuts and disregard using any molding on the steps themselves. It looks too 'heavy'.
 
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Old 10-08-12, 05:36 PM
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OK, perfect, ... now I just have to choose the right color.
Thank you for your advice.
 
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