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New install, where to start and other questions


skibum01's Avatar
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Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 40
MA

10-22-12, 01:21 PM   #1  
New install, where to start and other questions

I will be installing brazillian cherry (3/4" x 3-1/4") in a few days, ~400 sqft) It should be here tomorrow, and will have 10 days to acclimate to our home in MA. I have a few (hopefully general) questions/components I wanted to confirm before I got started.

1) 18 guage nails, 1 3/4" (3/4" exotic hardwood, going onto 3/4" plywood, ~20 year old home which just had carpet and staples removed)

2) 1/2" spacers for around the walls (will be tight up to door frame, in "A" below)

3) where to start (see drawing below) If I start a "A" and work both directions (left/right), use a spline for one side, I get it perfectly straight going through the wide doorway between the two rooms. If I start at "B" or "C" (C is ~5ft longer wall), I run the risk of having it be slightly non-parallel going through the doorframe is the B or C wall isn't perfectly parallel.

4) 2 transitions to 3/4" hardwood, there is a piece going perpendicular already of the other wood floors. since both floors with be 3/4", can I go up against this and have it be flat, or should I just use a T and leave a 1/2" gap on either side of it

5) underlayment - going over a basement with no water problems, humidifier is running. with that being said there is a white silicone vapor paper for ~$40 for 400sqft which would be a low cost option, and a firm foam with moisture barrier that I was told would reduce squeaking and help fill in imperfections in the subfloor if any, ~ $320 for 400sqft. Overall it's not a huge cost increase given the project total, just wondering what opinions are on this out there. Plywood is in good shape, but reducing squeaking would be a solid benefit if this type of very thin/firm foam does the trick. It seems like this is used a lot in laminate installs, not sure about hardwood.

6) T molding and first/last rows - drill/hand nail, and use colored wood putty. any specific nails you would recommend? or just a plain 1 1/2" finish nail and countersink?


Thanks again for your insight and experience, let me know if there is anything else I need to throw into this puzzle!


 
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czizzi's Avatar
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VA

10-23-12, 07:26 AM   #2  
Where to start....

1 -Use flooring cleats or flooring staples and a flooring gun if this is a nail down floor, 18 ga. nails are not sufficient

2 - Use 15# felt paper as your sound proof underlayment. staple to the subfloor and overlap each row by 3 to 4 inches

3 - 3/4" subfloor is marginal as far as thickness, make sure you screw the subfloor down to prevent squeaks from popping up down the road. Use deck screws or similar, do not use screws that are not rated for flooring (i.e. drywall screws). Also, when you say Plywood, just be sure it is not regular OSB or Particle Board as these are not recommended for a nail down floor.

4 - Whether you start at A, B, or C doesn't matter as the wall will still be out of square. I would use one wall as a reference and make several measures off of that (one at each side of the room) and snap a chaulk line. Then use that line to reference how much you are off on the opposite wall. Walls may wave a little so the chaulk line will be a straight reference point. Plan to start with a ripped board and end with a ripped board so you can account for the slight variations.

5 - Remove all baseboard moldings and undercut the door/archway jambs as well as door casing To do this, get a jamb saw, take a scrap of your flooring and felt. Lay them upside down adjacent to the Jamb/casing, lay your saw flat on top of the wood and use that as a height measurement to undercut. Your floor will have a much more finished look if you follow these procedures and tuck your floor under the molding and door jambs

6 - I would use T moldings at the thresholds. Different wood will move and expand at different rates.

7 - When doing your layout, try to pay attention to where the various outside corners are. One at the archway and one toward the hallway. You want to try to do your layout so that these hit somewhere close to the middle of a board. This prevents "sliver" cuts and will make for a stronger install.

 
skibum01's Avatar
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Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 40
MA

10-23-12, 07:41 AM   #3  
Thanks czizzi for the response. To your point 4 below, I was in the mindset that if I started at "A" in the middle, and worked left and right from there, it'd look good going through the doorway and I could hide any non-parallel lines at walls B and C (couch etc). Boards will be laid vertically in the picture below (like the kitchen/hallway boards).


On a related note to the underlayment, #15 felt vs white silicon paper vs Aquabar. All seem to be within the same price range, silicon paper boasts it doesn't give off "toxic fumes", and Aquabar seems similar to felt just won't mark walls. Would I be going the wrong way if I went Aquabar?


Last edited by skibum01; 10-23-12 at 09:46 AM.
 
czizzi's Avatar
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10-23-12, 11:06 AM   #4  
Have at it on the underlayment, just don't use foam of any kind. Felt or Aquabar is fine.

If you start with a good straight line, it doesn't matter where you start your flooring. Once your product arrives tomorrow, pull one carton apart and start dry laying it on the floor. Shift it, move it around and try multiple positions until you find one that covers all your bases. It will help you see what you need to do as far as final layout. See how it spaces out around all corners, walls archways. I doubt anyone but I would notice a 1 degree difference on the center archway walls.

 
skibum01's Avatar
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Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 40
MA

10-23-12, 12:05 PM   #5  
Good call on laying it out, play around with the layout a bit and then make good chalk lines as you guide. Thanks again for the advice.

 
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