Where to start, squaring room (should I ) etc.

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Old 11-27-12, 07:06 AM
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Where to start, squaring room (should I ) etc.

Hi all,

Did a quick search and di dnot see all my questions answered, so here goes. I have attached a picture of the room I am doing, it is a porch conversion. The room was meant to be a sort of sun room that lets in a lot of light. I need to go over floor and level it to as much as I can, then start laying floor. I am going to run the floor lengthwise paralell to longest walls. I had a contractor/handyman in to help do finish work and he said start at wall with windows and sliding door. The one tall wall now has a baseboard heat enclosure installed and is not shown in the picture (baseboard had to go in as some pipes go under floor and I needed access). I saw this article on squaring the room:
How to Start the First Row on Laminate Floor if the Wall is Not Straight | eHow.com
Seems reasonable but I can't go out 1/4" from windowed wall obviously since I have a few box-outs there that protrude. And the other wall has the baseboard.
Say I just picked an arbitrary distance from wall, say 4" and snapped lines on both sides and get the difference then I know to take half that and cut the first course according to the article. I know about exp. gaps.
My concern is that your eyes are obviously drawn toward the outside and the uneven first course might be noticeable. But if squaring it up is the best way I will do that.
When I finish with the last course I figure I will need to scrape off the lock on the tongue so I don't need to angle the board in and use carpenters glue on the last course to get the floor under the baseboard.

Any opinions?
 
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Old 11-27-12, 07:34 AM
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This is a bit off topic but anyway. That room is not a great candidate for a laminate floor. You have 2 doors and lots of windows and laminate does not like water at all. Just one summer rainstorm with an open window or wet foot traffic can swell the joints permanently. I think you would be better off with tile or some kind of vinyl.
 
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Old 11-27-12, 10:06 AM
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I appreciate the comment and in a perfect house that might be correct but the material is purchased and floor is going down. You can install laminate in wet area's, although you'd proably buy a specific laminate for that. With proper care and a watchful eye I am sure we can keep moisture to a minimum.

I've put a lot into this project. But the answer IS off topic and I am looking for answers to my questions. Anyone?
 
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Old 11-27-12, 10:28 AM
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I would start such that the seam of the first row hits directly at the bump out. Would make that transition easier for you to tackle. Would also allow for the different distance to the sliding door. Make it so that all you have to do is shave the tongue off the 2nd course to get by the pole and maintain your expansion gap. Later you can cover it with your shoe molding.

Do some math and check that the final row is not just a sliver but closer to a 1/2 board or whatever the recommendations are for the flooring you purchased.

Turn the heat on in the room, set all the flooring in the heated room and let acclimate for 72hrs. This brings the flooring to the same temp and relative humidity of the room.
 
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Old 11-27-12, 12:00 PM
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czizzi,
If I understand correctly you are saying put the seam right at the edge of the box-outs, correct?
Makes a lot of sense and a very good point. I'm glad I asked .

PS The heating is not yet installed but SHOULD be Friday, I am adding a new zone. Got it all piped out and just need to cut in to the feed and return, but that's another forum!
 
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Old 11-27-12, 01:41 PM
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Seam at edge of bump out, correct.

I strongly recommend that you hold on the flooring until the heat is on for a day or two. Then acclimate your flooring. Looks like you still have some finish work and painting to tackle. Good luck and shoot us all some finished pics.
 
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