New Oak Flooring/Need curved piece

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  #1  
Old 01-29-01, 10:41 PM
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In our great room, we had a subcontractor for a very reputable hardware supplier install wooden flooring, which was oak.

Our entranceway and kitchen are tiled, and when it came to cutting around the tile, the subcontractor led us to believe that he could handle the tile to floor transition effortlessly.

Unfortunately these little strips that you put in between, say the dining room and kitchen tile (which was a straight line) was a simple strip of oak...

but when it came to the 6-7 foot curved strip in the entrance way, he was at a loss.

He tried to put in a .25" to .5" quarterround type of strip, but it didn't match up...the tile is level at the ends but rises a quarter inch in the middle, so he couldn't figure out how to fix it.

He ended up putting in a stupid, ugly, plastic 1 inch bridge/gap/something that ruins the entire flooring job.

Now (sorry) for the real question, Is there ANYBODY in the world, who can take a six foot template that is curved and make a strip that will bridge the tile and oak flooring?

Thanks in advance, first time visitor, first time question



steve
 
  #2  
Old 01-30-01, 04:35 AM
Elite Flooring/Ken Fisher
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Steve:

I believe the best solution for a nice looking transition is to have the piece custom milled by a local cabinet related shop. I've had ones done before but they can get costly. The last one I had done was only six lineal feet and cost $300. Have them make the template as you don't want to error.
 
  #3  
Old 01-30-01, 06:36 AM
A
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Steve,

See this previous post for information on "stress warping" oak molding.

http://forum.doityourself.com/showth...threadid=46704

 
  #4  
Old 01-30-01, 07:02 AM
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curved molding

Thanks, gentlemen, for great replies.I'm sure this subcontractor wished he had known about the stress technique...he may have been able to do it then...

So...I'll attempt to find the piece with horizontal lines and give it a shot...if not I'll try to find a cabinet shop. What would I call a piece of molding that when viewed from the side, resembles a "T"? In other words it is flat on top to bridge the two different surfaces with a stem lying in between?

Thanks again!
 
  #5  
Old 01-30-01, 07:35 AM
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Re: curved molding

Originally posted by stevesharber
So...I'll attempt to find the piece with horizontal lines and give it a shot...if not I'll try to find a cabinet shop. What would I call a piece of molding that when viewed from the side, resembles a "T"? In other words it is flat on top to bridge the two different surfaces with a stem lying in between?

Thanks again!
You want VERTICAL grain lines, NOT HORIZONTAL.

T-molding.
 
  #6  
Old 01-30-01, 02:33 PM
Elite Flooring/Ken Fisher
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Ark:

Thanks for chipping in. I could see it working with quarter round but in general T-moldings are 2" in width. You bring up a great point and it leads me to believe the radius T would look much better in one piece, such as the way curved solid hardwood railings are made.

Of the times I have dealt with custom radius transitions for hardwood flooring, they were pieced together with 4-5 pieces of flat grain material, rather than cutting the lengths down to pieces of 3/16" +- material then laminating, bending and milling to the T Mold shape.

I'll have to remember that, however the procedure will take longer and I'm sure my cost would increase substantially. What the heck, it would surely look better.

Thanks again
 
 

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