Adding Polyurethane Coat to Hardwood Refinished One Month Ago

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  #1  
Old 01-04-13, 12:58 PM
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Adding Polyurethane Coat to Hardwood Refinished One Month Ago

Recently purchased a 1939 brick colonial that has needed a ton of work. We've had contractors in the house for the last 2 months. I had a handyman type guy refinish my hardwood floors about a month ago (somewhat of a mistake). He sanded, stained and polyurethaned all 2000 sq ft. Two coats of oil based poly on the majority of the floor and only one coat on the hallways and stairs (he ended up moving on to before completely finishing). Now that all of the contractors are out of the house for a few weeks it's time for me to finish the job that the handyman didn't. I want to add that 2nd coat of poly to the hallways and stairs (and possibly a 3rd coat).

It's been one month since the last coat was applied. By now it has thoroughly cured. What do i do? Rough it up with 120 grit, tack it then brush on a coat of polyurethane?

Please help. We spent way too much on these floors to have them last for 3 years because they weren't sufficiently sealed.

Thanks in advance and I think this is my first ever post here so thanks for welcoming me!

Pete
 
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Old 01-04-13, 01:04 PM
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Welcome to the forums Pete!

It's no big deal to apply another coat or two of poly. You do need to sand and remove the sanding dust. What grit to use depends on the condition of the floor. I wouldn't think you'd need anything coarser than 120 and 150-180 might be ok. The main thing is to not sand thru the poly and remove any stain! It's always best to sand lightly between coats - that promotes adhesion. What grit to use depends on how much sanding is needed to get a slick finish.

It's always best to have 3 coats of poly on the floor. That gives the best looking job along with decent wear.
 
  #3  
Old 01-04-13, 01:15 PM
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Very relieving. The handyman guy is actually a really good carpenter/cabinet maker but a kind of lazy and the 3 workers he hired to help with the floors were a combination of unskilled and unmotivated. End result is a lot of swirl marks and the previously mentioned minimal finish. The guy told me to sand by hand with a fairly fine grit -- no sander, no pole, not even a sanding block. He said that's the way to make sure i'm not only hitting the high points. I'm guessing that's a little overcautious but what the hell, it's my house to be overcautious with and it's not that much square footage left. Unless I hear otherwise I'm going to try 120 grit by hand then vacuum, tack cloth it and brush on with a china white bristle brush (if i can find one). Good plan?
 
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Old 01-04-13, 01:21 PM
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To remove the swirls you'll probably have to sand thru the stain although they might not be as noticeable with a light stain as they are with darker stains.

I couldn't image doing all that sanding by hand, when he originally sanded the floor, did he not get it even? I'd probably use a 1/2 or 1/4 sheet electric sander. You can always go back and hand sand select spots if need be.

You shouldn't have any problems finding a white china bristle brush. Most any paint store will have them. While I prefer the white bristle, the black china bristles tend to wear longer. Don't know if you have enough flooring for that to be an issue.
 
  #5  
Old 01-04-13, 01:47 PM
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I disagree with your handyman, I think hand sanding is the easiest way to create an uneven surface, a pole or sanding block would be much better. Also, the sanding between coats of poly is not a finish sand, it's a scuff sand to roughen up the surface and create nooks and crannies for the next coat of polyurethane to flow into while wet to create a mechanical bond between the layers - you shouldn't be worrying about high spots at that point.
 
  #6  
Old 01-07-13, 05:46 PM
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Well, the job is done. Looks great. I thoroughly cleaned the floors of all of the drywall dust... swept, vacuumed, swept, wiped up dust by hand... all before sanding. Then I sanded mostly by hand with 120 and a sanding block. Then i swept, vacuumed and tack clothed it and followed up with oil based poly via 3 inch white bristle brush. The whole process was very therapeutic.
 
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