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Particle board flooring


mileyrae2's Avatar
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01-31-13, 06:30 AM   #1  
Particle board flooring

Iwant to use particle board for my main floor. (I seen this in a friends house) They cut the 4x8 sheets of particle board into 16 inch squares then nailes these down to the subfloor, put a couple of coats of polyurethane on and they were finished. It really looked amazing. I woul like to try this but with some differences. I would like to use a light stain and glue it down. I also know tha if particle board gets wet it disintegrates. Any sugesstions how I might do this project to have it last.

 
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01-31-13, 06:45 AM   #2  
Welcome to the forums!

IMO the best idea is not to do it
If you are set on doing this I'd apply poly to all 6 sides before installation. I'd test one square with stain first to see if you'll be satisfied with the results. A tinted poly might look better than stain although tinted polys aren't rated for floor use. If just the 1st coat is tinted poly and the next 2 are regular floor poly - it should be ok.


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01-31-13, 06:47 AM   #3  
Welcome to the forums.

Particle board will likely not take stain, as stain works by absorbing into the surface and I don't think particle board will do that. I could be wrong, maybe try on a piece of scrap first.

Particle board is also not durable, you definitely will want to have several layers of polyurethane on this.

Personally, I would not do this, I don't think it will turn out well but if you do attempt it, please post pictures when you're done, you definitely have my curiosity piqued.

 
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01-31-13, 06:57 AM   #4  
Mitch, PB will take stain, I'm just not fond of how it looks. PB tends to stain darker than pine does. Years ago I worked for an outfit that painted for a builder that always used PB shelves in the closets. On the houses that stained - we stained the PB too. I don't guess anyone complained but it wasn't something I'd want in my house.


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01-31-13, 07:16 AM   #5  
Thanks, Mark - I didn't know whether it would but figured someone like you would know.

I can certainly believe it would not look good....

 
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01-31-13, 08:22 AM   #6  
I actually shuddered a bit when I read the first post but decided to hold my opinion. I will now just ditto the above remarks. I have seen plenty of particle board flooring and cabinets that were total disasters. Hopefully with enough polly it will hold up but certainly wouldn't be my choice. But vive la différence. If you like it go for it.


I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you.

 
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01-31-13, 11:07 AM   #7  
Good Luck. You will most likely be taking it up or covering it within a few years.

 
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01-31-13, 04:47 PM   #8  
Just because your friend did it does not make it a viable and correct procedure to follow. It probably is also the reason you came to this forum to "test the waters" on weather it was a good idea or not. IMO the guy or company that invented particle board for flooring applications should be lock up and the key thrown away for the fraud perpetrated on millions of households throughout the years.

Take a sabbatical and spend a month or two working for a flooring company doing installs. It will verify why everyone on this thread is advising against the installation. Any moisture, I mean any will cause the floor to fail. You can not imagine the amount of particle board I have removed from residential housing. The only positive and good thing about it is..... that is is so unstable that it is easy to rip out.

 
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01-31-13, 05:40 PM   #9  
Hey, czizzi I had a customer who was convinced by another handyman that the best underlayment for vinyl tile in a bathroom with a claw foot tub was particle board. She ran a daycare and the bathroom was used by young children. Any guess what it looked like when she called me to "fix" the previous guy's work?


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01-31-13, 05:49 PM   #10  
You're right on the removal. It's nice when you come to a cabinet with PB under it. Just lift the PB and it breaks clean at the cabinet. Put down your 3/4' Advantech and keep on rollin'. Unless the job called for cabinet removal, it's a moot point.
In addition, I think you would be hard pressed to even FIND particle board nowadays. I never look for it, but can't imagine anyone using it for anything. Shelving, yeah, maybe.

 
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02-01-13, 05:35 AM   #11  
Hey Ray - If I can expand on a statement in my previous post.... There are also lot of "contractors" who should also be locked up and the key thrown away for the fraud perpetrated on millions of households throughout the years.

Research, get references, ask to see a license and request a copy of the contractors insurance - Its that simple. Even though is may seem more expensive to get a licensed contractor to do your improvements, it many times is cheaper in the long run when (not if) you have to correct a botched job or other mistake.

This forum helps you get it right the first time for those DIY'ers.

 
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