Raising existing floor

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  #1  
Old 02-18-13, 03:36 AM
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Raising existing floor

this is my first time posting on a forum so hopefully this is the correct area.

I am trying to remove a wall between my kitchen and dining room to make it one room. there are existing hardwood floors in the dinning room and i recently ripped the kitchen floor down to the old tongue and groove plank subfloor. i need to now raise it back up 3/4" to make it level with the existing hardwoods in hopes i can lay down an engineered hardwood floating floor throughout.

from what i've read i should first lay down felt then 3/4 in subfloor plywood. should i lay it down perpendicular to the planks or parallel? Next frome what ive read i should secure it to the planks not the joists using decking screws correct?

Also, i tried to post a pic of the situation but keep getting a upload failed message, any idea what i'm doing wrong?
 

Last edited by iceeboxx; 02-18-13 at 03:51 AM.
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Old 02-18-13, 04:16 AM
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Welcome to the forums iceeboxx!

See if this helps - http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...-pictures.html
 
  #3  
Old 02-18-13, 05:52 AM
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I moved your question into its own thread, should have better visibility this way.
 
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Old 02-19-13, 02:24 AM
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thanks mark. i couldn't figure out how to start my own thread
 
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Old 02-19-13, 02:43 AM
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[IMG][/IMG]

here are the pictures
 
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Old 02-19-13, 03:04 AM
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You will be laying down an underlayment directly under the flooring, so doubling that under the subflooring may cause a moisture trap. Lay your new subflooring directly on the planks, securing between joists. I would, first, secure all the planks to the joists using screws to help prevent squeaking later on. Lay the plywood perpendicular to the joists, just as your planks are. Don't guess there is any way to talk you into tile for the kitchen and leaving the hardwood in the other room, huh?
 
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Old 02-22-13, 02:29 AM
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thanks for the advice chandler i would have laid down an underlayment then subfloor then underlayment and i would have laid the subfloor perpindicular to the planks. i have screwed a few spots in the planks that squeak, but for the most part the original subfloor is squeak free. i guess we have decided to rip up all the hardwoods and put down a new subfloor throughout the whole downstairs so that we have the option of laying real hardwoods or engineered hardwoods and being able to nail them down.

as far as tile.... no way i'm not a fan all the dirt ends up in the grout lines when you sweep, plus there is the added cost of laying down concrete board, not to mention the expertise needed to lay tile
 
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Old 02-22-13, 03:01 AM
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I think your plan is spot on, including full size hardwood flooring. The tile mention was just for the kitchen area and my concerns of water damaging the wood products. Good luck and let us know if you have any more questions. Sounds like a plan.
 
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Old 02-22-13, 01:39 PM
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i plan on sealing between every joint with either glue or at least silcone. also thats why i was considering engineered hardwood as i've heard they hold up to water a little better
 
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Old 02-22-13, 04:06 PM
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Sealing between what joints? Wood does not hold up to water, period. If you are nailing this down, you don't use glue or anything in the joints. The wood has to move.
 
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Old 02-23-13, 02:26 AM
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my plan was to install an engineered hardwood floor via the floating floor installation, which according to the installation instructions has you gluing between each tongue and groove joint
 
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Old 02-23-13, 03:52 AM
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Read up on this very well. Ask others who have also glued up flooring as to their experiences. Glue is messy. You will need to use something to compress the flooring such as straps until it dries..........Just not a fan of glue up anything. Good luck with it. Replacement of your subflooring is a great idea.
 
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