Laminate flooring in dry basement

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  #1  
Old 04-19-13, 12:14 PM
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Laminate flooring in dry basement

Hey guys, we just bought laminate flooring for our basement, and I was given a large bucket of low odor Drylock from a neighbor, and was wondering if it would be necessary to use it on the basement floor, and walls. We had the house built in 2009, and have not had one issue with any moisture seeping through the walls, or the floor. I planned on coating the walls, and the floor with the drylock, followed by 6ml plastic, and then installing the laminate with the attached under layment. Don't mind doing the work now, if it could help prevent something bad in the future. Any suggestions would be much appreciated. .
 
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Old 04-19-13, 12:20 PM
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Good luck. Laminate is not supposed to be installed below grade. You should have bought engineered.
 
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Old 04-19-13, 03:10 PM
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My father bought a house with laminate flooring, and has never had an issue in the 15 years he has owned it. I know of many other folks who have done it, and no issues. In fact, it says it right on the box that you can, if you take the necessary precautions before installing it. Now back to my question. . .

Drylock basement floor or?
 
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Old 04-19-13, 03:35 PM
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I assume this is to be conditioned space when you are completed (you have another active post I believe). Have you done a moisture test on the floor? Tape a piece of plastic (garbage bag) to the floor and let it sit for a couple days. Remove and look for signs of moisture.

You will also want to check the level of the concrete to make sure it is flat enough to accept a floating floor. Its only as flat as the operator of the float who installed it. Might have been an understudies first time solo. Use a buddy system and each pull on the end of some mason string and move around the room touching the taught string to the cement. Make sure that there isn't a small rise around the perimeter or around support poles.

If you hired me, I would install the laminate per your request, but you would also sign a waver releasing me from liability should you have problems with the floor. But I would also highly recommend against it and encourage you to seek alternatives. Many times people gravitate to laminate because of the price. Sam has suggested a better alternative.

It only takes a clogged gutter or loose downspout to dump a ton of water against the foundation. Just trying to play devils advocate for your future and your current investment. There is a current active post of a person having water problems in a basement with laminate. Maybe you can show him your fathers house......
 
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Old 04-19-13, 03:37 PM
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Drylock is a last chance product for an attempt at waterproofing walls and floors. If you have any moisture problems, drylock is not a cure all, and laminate flooring is not your friend.

Now that the question is answered. No where can I find that a manufacturer recommends laying laminate in below grade situations. What "necessary precautions" does this manufacturer say is appropriate? They just can't say "take heed" without giving some sort of "heed" to take.
 
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Old 04-19-13, 04:25 PM
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Sam floor go to pergo ,armstrong ,tarket. dupont and they all say laminate is good for basements. Not sure where you looked. They all say a moisture barrier pad for concrete and I have had laminate flooring in my basement in the house I had built 7 years ago and no problems yet.Of course I also have a superior wall basement with a drain(weeping tile) installed on 3 sides and drains out both sides of house in rear. Of course if you have a block basement and moisture problems I would not put laminate or engineered wood there.
 
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Old 04-19-13, 05:05 PM
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But all manufacturers, although they say OK to install below grade, also set parameters in their warranty that make such an installation almost un doable, like constant low humidity, no moisture. Too many customers want to install laminate in areas where, although they think it is a comfort zone, is really a high humidity zone and will cause laminate to fail.
Of course I don't like laminate anyway, so I am not a good recommendation person.
 
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Old 04-19-13, 05:13 PM
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See what RH you have to maintain in a basement to retain the warranty. It is usually impossible.
 
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Old 04-19-13, 05:35 PM
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Thank you for those that have actually attempted to answer my question. Nowhere did I say "Is laminate ok to install in a basement?" The laminate has already been purchased. . . The laminate is Pergo, and it does say it is safe for basement on the box(why would I make this up?), and even has a moisture resistant under lament.

Is it a waste of my time to Drylock the basement floor?
 
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Old 04-19-13, 05:38 PM
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I taped a piece of aluminum foil down on several sections of the floor and wall for one week, and had no moisture on either side of the foil.
 
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Old 04-19-13, 06:10 PM
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Cool,. have at it. We only do this for a living. I hope you stand 100% behind your own guarantee.


and, I think Chandler answered your question already.
 
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Old 04-19-13, 06:12 PM
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Then you don't have moisture problems, Drylock will be a waste of time and money, and you trust Pergo. I say it is good to go.
 
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Old 04-20-13, 07:15 AM
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Maybe you will be lucky, as someone who has installed flooring for 40 years, I would not do it. Just remember, if moisture ruins it, there is no warranty. Moisture, including RH, voids all warranties for laminate. And to answer your question, Drylock is a waste of money.
 
  #14  
Old 04-20-13, 12:12 PM
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I say no need for dry loc. put down a moisture barrier pad and install the laminate. enjoy.
 
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