Suggestions on repairing 4x4 section of Hardwood.

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Old 05-09-13, 09:04 AM
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Suggestions on repairing 4x4 section of Hardwood.

So I've got a 300 sq ft area of hardwood flooring that has a 4' x 4' section that needs to be replaced (too damaged to be repaired)

I've been told that the replacement boards come pre-finished, so I won't have to resurface. But the floors haven't been resurfaced for, my guess is ten years. So I was thinking of having the flooring guys repair the boards and resurface the whole thing to give it a fresh appearance.

1) Anyone have an idea of the cost to have someone resurface one 300 sq ft area, and then poly it? Just want to know what i should be expecting.

2) The replacement boards aren't expensive, but anyone have an idea on what I should expect to pay for the work to replace that 4'X4' section.

3) They say they may not have matching boards, but can get somewhat close......if thats the case, after they resurface, can I stain the whole thing to give me a more uniform color to disguise the 4'x4' section?


I'm not paying for this work, but can't go crazy, and was considering having someone just replace the boards and sand and poly myself, or stain and poly myself, but since I've never done it, I don't want to get into more trouble than it's worth. (the benefit of doing it myself would be that the person paying could just pay me for my labor.)

*How much stain and poly do you think I'd need for 300 sq ft


Thanks in advance for the advice and help!
 
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Old 05-09-13, 01:28 PM
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Why would you want to use prefinished boards if you have to sand them down and finish them?
As long as the boards are the same width and species it shouldn't be a big deal to lace them in, sand and refinish. You can't really finish just a portion of a room. You'd want to sand the entire floor, stain [or not] and apply the poly between coats. it will take less than 1 gallon of stain and 2 gallons of poly will give 2-3 coats.
 
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Old 05-09-13, 03:59 PM
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Mark is spot on with the wood dimensions. The most critical dimension is width. They must be EXACTLY the same width or all bets are off. It will always look like patch.......a bad one.
 
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Old 05-09-13, 11:11 PM
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Floor Help

Last post was right, You don't need to buy anything if your going to have the work done. usually the job runs anywhere from 3-5 per sq ft. to do the floor. This should cover the refinish; sanding, stain, and finish at least two coats. The patch job is another matter check prices from your finisher. A patch job should NEVER :NO NO NO:show if the guy knows what he or she is doing. They should do the patch sand the floor and bingo new floor.
 
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Old 05-09-13, 11:17 PM
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Not true at all, I've done patches where floor vents went and you could never tell!! the patch should be toothed in, alternate boards. IN other words you actually remove some good boards to. follow linkhttp://www.ourfixerupper.com/hardwood-floor-repair-its-a-start.htm . Patch should never be done in a square, hope this helps.
 
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Old 05-10-13, 02:43 AM
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Not sure what is "not true at all", but I think the answers so far are right. Agree with toothing in the flooring, but you can't tooth in a floor where the existing floor is, say 3 1/4" wide with flooring that is 3 1/8" wide due to milling differences. It'll look crappy.
 
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Old 05-10-13, 02:10 PM
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Thanks for all the help guys.


So it looks like I'm going to have someone come in and just replace the 4'x'4 section, and I'm going to handle the sanding, staining, and poly.

Since this is my first floor resurfacing it was suggested by a friend to rent an ORBITAL SANDER over a Drum. The reason being is that it's easier to damage the floors with a drum, especially if it's the first time I'm using one, and an orbital may take a bit longer but is easier to manage.

Can you guys echo that?

I'm familiar with the process, though I'm curious as to whether screening the floor with wood filler is always done. I'm guessing it's a case by case thing.

I've been seeing people using a buffer and a piece of carpet to apply the stain (i'm really hoping to not use a brush), has anyone here used this application process, and do I have to sand the floor again after the first coat of stain? I've never done that with other wood projects I've stained.

If i can't manage the buffer, is a staining pad on a painting pole, the second fastest option?

And is it possible to roll on the poly or should I be using a pad for that. (I know a brush is BEST, but i'm trying to reduce the time for application)

I appreciate the help.
 
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Old 05-10-13, 02:33 PM
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An orbital or buffer sander is a LOT more diy friendly. The problem a novice [and some pros] can get into with a drum sander is if you don't move it at a constant speed and/or don't manage your stopping points correctly you can sand waves into the floor. A buffer with a sanding pad is a more idiot proof.

A pad works great for applying the stain but depending on your expertise with the pad you might still need to remove the excess with a rag. It's rarely a good idea to apply more than one coat of stain. Stains are designed to soak into the wood with the excess removed. Once the stain is dry it becomes hard for the wood to absorb more stain. Stain dries mainly by absorption and any excess stain may not dry and will complicate the finishing process!

Poly can be rolled on but it won't give the nicest looking finish. Both brush and lambswool pad lay the poly down nicely. While a decent diy job can be had with a roller, it won't be as nice as what can be achieved with a pad or brush.

You don't sand the stain but should sand [or screen] between coats of poly.
 
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