Help with first laminate flooring project please :)

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  #1  
Old 05-24-13, 01:40 AM
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Help with first laminate flooring project please :)

I have a step down entry way into my livingroom that is current covered with linoleum. I am going to install a laminate floor over the linoleum if possible because this stuff is ON SOLID!
My fist question is do I work from the wall toward the step of from the step toward the wall? Secondly, what is the process for the stair nose ? Is there some kind of track that I screw down that a stairnose would fit into and then I install the planks up close to the track and work toward wall? I also was wondering what the process is for cutting the last piece to fit around the door jamb and the areas that are rounded or angled? Here is a picture of the stepdown...
http://i784.photobucket.com/albums/y...524_011236.jpg

Thanks for the help!
 
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Old 05-24-13, 02:55 AM
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Welcome to the forums! the entry foyer appears to be a pour of some sort, as opposed to linoleum. Are you planning on covering it with laminate? IMO, leaving that as a pour will help keep water off your laminate, since it soaks it up so well. I am not a fan of laminate, so keeping it away from water sources is imperative. Laminate does not turn vertical corners very well. If you are set to do this foyer, then end the laminate at the edge using a flat transition piece, starting with the transition piece working toward the door.
 
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Old 05-24-13, 06:54 AM
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Are you 100% sure that's linolium? If it were I would think there would have had to have been some edging to protect the outside edges.
I agree 100%, poor place to lay laminite. Water damage and the need for a trasition strip on the edges form a trip hazzard are just two reasons.
 
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Old 05-24-13, 11:42 AM
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Ouch..I was really hoping to be able to cover this stuff up. It doesnt go with the livingroom at all ... Any other alternatives?
 
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Old 05-24-13, 03:32 PM
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Let us know exactly what that stuff is on the floor and we can figure something out. Is it solid, or rubbery?
 
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Old 05-25-13, 01:43 AM
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It feels more solid when you knock on it. I could see it being a pour, but also some kidna of linoleum type material. Feels like a coating of plastic almost and doesn't wear out in areas of high traffic...it is smooth to the touch and feels like plastic... if that helps... I really want to at least feel like I have an option... the color is bad! LOL
 
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Old 05-25-13, 01:53 AM
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I have seen this type of stairnose in a house that seemed to reduce the trip hazard.. but am not sure if it could be used on my stepdown ornot.... looks like it smoothly connects into thelaminate without a change in elevation...I'm not sure how it stays down solid like it needs to though without being attached to some kind of track underneath... maybe it has holes that fit screws with little plugs to cover the screwheads... i dunno

Mohawk Santa Barbara: Stair Nose Cognac Hickory - 84" Long | Efloors.com
 
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Old 05-25-13, 05:05 AM
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The stair nose you linked to is a solid piece of wood and is designed to marry to an engineered or solid wood floor. Engineered floor is kind of like plywood, only the top most layer is solid wood. And while engineered floors are made up of laminated woods, it is not the same as laminate floors. Laminate floors are processed wood fiber boards with a picture of wood glued on. They click together and float over a sound deadening membrane.

I think we can get to either one of these floating floors, but have to wiggle are way through figuring out what is currently down in your foyer. If you rap on it, does it sound hollow or solid. Does it sound the same no matter where you tap it? Can you drive a nail into it? Test the nail in the farthest corner of the vertical part of the step, or in the back corner of the closet.

The reason for the nail questions, is that we need to strongly adhere any stair nosing to the floor to prevent a trip hazard. Stair nosing takes quite a bit of abuse, so need to make sure we can positively secure to move forward.
 
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Old 05-25-13, 03:23 PM
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Yes this stuff is solid and it sounds the same anywher you tap on it. It appears to me that it might be some kind of pour just by the fact that it is so smooth in the stairnose area. It is nota solid color though... it looks like little specs of gray, blue, and yellow that is uniform throughought and I dont know if pours come out that way or not... I am going to try the nail when I get home... it is definitely solid on there... im gonna post more pictures tonight. I appreciate the help!
 
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Old 05-25-13, 03:35 PM
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If it is solid, you may be able to coat it with a epoxy similar to how you would treat a garage floor. Not the wood look you want, but you could at least make it work better with your furnishings. Not an optimal solution, but something to throw out there....
 
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Old 05-25-13, 05:16 PM
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Yeah... so basically my only options would be a pour or tile? What about tile that looks like wood? ... this is a bummer
 
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Old 05-25-13, 05:42 PM
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We have other options, did you get a nail to hold without cracking it?
 
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Old 05-26-13, 12:56 PM
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Old 05-26-13, 04:14 PM
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Still holding on the nail test, If that does not work, can we drill into it so that we can get an anchor in there to hold a screw?
 
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Old 05-26-13, 04:28 PM
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Based on your latest pictures, I really like the foyer effect that material gives your entrance. Good place, as indicated, for kids boots, etc without getting the main floor wet. I would bring new flooring up to this and leave it as it is. It will be an accent to the room, no doubt.
 
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Old 05-26-13, 06:39 PM
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Yes, I can drive a nail into it but I haven't screwed into it. The material is not the problem, it really doesn't match with anything in the room and looks very outdated. I understand the function, but I was wondering what my options were if I did decide to put a different floor in?
 
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Old 05-26-13, 07:46 PM
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If you can nail and the nail will hold then you can do the following.

You can rip a piece of 3/4" wood to the height of the landing and nail it to the vertical portion of the step. Add some construction adhesive in the process to help with the bond. Then you can take something like the stair nosing you referred to earlier and place it on top of the piece you just installed overlapping the horizontal surface of the current landing and nail with construction glue to that piece and the floor. You can then install an engineered floor progressing from there back toward the door and expand int the closet. Would prefer you went with an engineered over laminate as you need the stability of real wood for the landing transition.
 
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Old 05-27-13, 03:15 AM
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Consider, too, the height you have to work with in regards to opening the door. Will it allow you to install engineered flooring, or even (yuk) laminate? This will answer the question right off...."can I do it at all?"
 
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Old 05-27-13, 05:06 PM
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It will definitely be close on the engineered floor. This project seems to be getting more and more complicated. Does anyone know if tile, maybe even tile that looks like wood, is a good option for entry ways? And would I be able to lay tile on this flooring?
 
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Old 05-27-13, 05:56 PM
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Something like this might still be able to achieve the look I was going for...
So glad I didn't install the laminate and posted this first..

MARAZZI Montagna Saddle 24 in. x 6 in. Glazed Porcelain Floor and Wall Tile (14.53 sq. ft. / case)-ULG5 at The Home Depot

what do you think?
 
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Old 05-27-13, 08:14 PM
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What is the major difference betweeen laminate and engineered wood floor? Is it the thickness, installation, or just the material it's composed of?
 
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Old 05-28-13, 03:25 AM
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Engineered flooring is layered wood, similar to plywood with a sandable or refinishable layer on top with aluminum oxide as an initial finish. It comes, usually, in thicknesses from 3/8 to 5/8". Very sturdy flooring.

Laminate is basically MDF or HDF with a picture of wood pasted to the top of it and a coat of aluminum oxide on top. It is not sandable, nor refinishable, and if it gets wet, or humidity gets too high, it's toast.
 
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Old 05-28-13, 02:59 PM
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Oh well that sounds like it'd be perfect. Do you think I could put down a moisture barrier and lay engineered wood flooring down right on top of the pour that is currently down on my floor pictured in my earlier posts?
 
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Old 05-28-13, 03:05 PM
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and for your suggestion czizzi would the piece of wood that is going to fit vertically with the stairnose overlapping... I couldn't use a piece of the engineered wood flooring rippied to fit? I would have to use some other kind of wood and stain to match? LOL I know I really don't know what i'm talking about but I really wanna learn this stuff and I am going to go for it in the near future...
 
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Old 05-28-13, 04:25 PM
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We are on the same page, L.Young, just need to ease into the final installment.

Need to check clearance on the Door. Make sure you have a 1/2" of clearance to make the front door operate with the new floor.

Put something thick down and check clearance if the new floor will work. Open and closer the door with a 1/2" test strip to see if we have problems.
 
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Old 05-28-13, 05:31 PM
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do most engineered floor products come with a moisture barrier already attached to the bottom? I'm really hoping to have a half inch clearance! Its gonna be close! I'm gonna check when i get home! thanks!
 
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Old 05-28-13, 05:37 PM
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Some do, but they may be too thick for you. As a general rule, use whatever the manufacturer says to use to keep within their warranty.
 
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Old 05-28-13, 07:06 PM
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That makes sense... Are most engineered hardwood floors floating floors like laminate or do I have to nail each piece down?
 
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Old 05-29-13, 07:41 AM
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Just measured door clearance and its .75" the space is 4'7" x 11'9"
 
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Old 05-29-13, 01:28 PM
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You're good for engineered flooring. I really like the click lock engineered flooring. It is floating, but you can install some as staple down. I prefer floating click lock.
 
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Old 05-30-13, 04:55 PM
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Awesome! My only concern is the stair nose if its floating I would have to secure the stair nose pretty firmly I'd imagine. Not exactly sure how that would play out...
 
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Old 05-30-13, 05:43 PM
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How do you plan on handling the rise on the foyer area? I am curious as it will depend on how you will install a nosing. In all probability you will need to use a very strong adhesive to secure the nose in place, and once it has dried, THAT will be your starting point for your flooring, working toward the door. PL makes an 8x adhesive that I have tried to remove pieces glued to subflooring and the wood shredded. I had to remove it all with a beveled sharp scraper, not a 5n1. That would be my choice of adhesives.
 
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Old 05-31-13, 07:10 AM
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If I glue the stairnose straight to subfloor how can I make sure its level with the floor if th other planks have moisture barrier?
 
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Old 05-31-13, 05:16 PM
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You can leave the vb a little short where the connection will be made and slip in the flooring to the transition. Good point, though.
 
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Old 06-02-13, 01:27 AM
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Well I originally was going to just rip a strip of flooring for the rish and glue it down. Then either but a track I can nail down that the stairnose would attach to. But seems like that not an option. Its too bad they dont make stairnoses with pop out hols you can nail them down with and then push the circle of hardwood back into hole over top the nail or screw. Im not sure what im gonna do... I cant glue down the stairnose because of the difference in height the planks will have unless I pick a stairnose that fits over the top of the closest plank.... What would you guys do? Here's the pic again so ya don't have to scroll.

http://i784.photobucket.com/albums/y...524_011236.jpg
 
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Old 06-02-13, 01:31 AM
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The current floor holds a nail and I have about .7" front door clearance
 
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Old 06-02-13, 02:54 AM
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You may can use something like this, but drilling and plugging the nose may be in order.

Name:  laminate-stair-nose.jpg
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Old 06-02-13, 06:50 AM
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Get a plug cutter and pull some plugs to cover your screw holes. You should have extra material left over from the molding to do this. Get a 3/8" plug cutter and use a 3/8" forstner bit to cut a nice hole in your stair nosing. Practice on some scrape first.

http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?p...FWQ6QgodhAIAvw
 
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Old 06-02-13, 05:24 PM
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So I would drill a 3/8" hole in my stairnose deep enough so a screw head is under the surface then cut a 3/8" plug and glue it in hole over the screw. Then cut it close to floor level and sand it down? Is that the process?
 
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Old 06-13-13, 11:16 PM
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In that picture it seems like htere is nothing holding the stairnose down?
 
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