Options with a low doorway threshold

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  #1  
Old 06-17-13, 08:28 AM
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Options with a low doorway threshold

Hello,

Recently had floating hardwood floors installed throughout our main level. We had anticipated using quarter round to hide the expansion gap next to the front door's threshold. The issue that we've now found now, after the floors have been laid, is that our front door sits just a little too low to make quarter round an option. It comes in contact with the top of the transition piece by about 1/8ish.

Now before you continue, you may have just smacked your forehead while saying "Why didn't you test the height in the first place?!" My answer to that is, "...yep..." At this point it is what it is and I'll admit fault for not using proper foresight while installing this part of the house.

I think I have a few options to make this right, but would love any input or advice on the options below (or others I may not be considering):

1. Cut one edge off the quarter round with a table saw (basically trim it a blade's length, effectively getting rid of that top part that hits the door.

2. Use a baby threshold molding piece, arguably the most visually appealing option. The problem is that we only have the 1/4-in expansion gap from the wood to the threshold itself. To properly install this piece, I would have to cut the planks of wood in the threshold so that expansion gap is more like 1 inch, then I can rest the "nose" part of the threshold piece down on the subfloor and fasten it like that. I think there are serious issues I could run into by doing this kind of cut on an already-installed floor, or am I wrong? I imagine cutting the floor would require a circular saw to make the long cut parallel to the threshold, then like a small router bit or mutli-tool saw to fix/clean up the outer parts of the cut (effectively making like a u-shape cut in the area). Would making these kinds of cuts be problematic to the integrity of the floor?

3. Take the baby threshold molding piece, cut off the bottom nose part of it, effectively making it one flat piece of wood, then glue that to the top of the boards next to the threshold. My main issue with this is that I feel like these transition pieces can get beaten up over time. If I glue this directly to the actual hardwoods and need to replace it, I risk seriously damaging the wood when trying to remove the piece. I may be over-thinking that risk, but would love input on this.

4. Use a reducer transition piece but install it backwards (so the high part goes up against the threshold. To do this, however, I think I'd need to drill holes in the hardwood then nail/screw the reduce through these holes and into the subfloor. Those holes would allow the proper expansion space for the floor. Issue here is that I'd now have holes in the floor, albeit covered, that could maybe cause moisture issues down the road. If down the line I wanted to redo that transition entirely to say a quarter round (assuming I reinstall/raise the doorway itself, for example), I'd have these holes to deal with that could be far enough out from the threshold to make a quarter round never an option.


5. Burn the house down. (kidding, obviously!)



Thanks in advance for your time and help.
 
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  #2  
Old 06-17-13, 08:35 AM
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Use Tee transition strip. Rip it so it looks like an L, use constrution adhesive and a few trim nails, but only in the thick part not into the flooring.
 
  #3  
Old 06-17-13, 10:21 AM
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Forgot to note that one below, I did consider this but ran into the same issue as the baby threshold molding pieces where I'd need to run a circular saw to cut the hardwoods back from the threshold. Not sure if making that kind of cut would mess up the floors in some way. If not, I'd opt for the baby threshold transition piece just for consistency (have another door with one of those)
 
  #4  
Old 06-17-13, 06:42 PM
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I'd be using an ossilating saw not a ciruler saw, a lot more control.
 
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