How to repair a small (8" square) damage to a hardwod floor

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  #1  
Old 08-18-13, 06:44 PM
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How to repair a small (8" square) damage to a hardwod floor

The protector on one of the legs on a chair of my dining room set broke and exposed a nail like post and it scratched an approx 8" section on my hardwood floor. The section got dirty and my mother tried to "clean" it leaving a scratched blackish 8" section on my floor. I really don't want to completely redo the entire LR/DR floor but want to make the spot "look better" than it does now. Any advice would be appreciated.
 
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Old 08-19-13, 03:34 AM
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Welcome to the forums Marty!

Pics might be helpful - http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...-pictures.html

Cleaning the area with a little bit of mineral spirits might remove the black.
 
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Old 08-19-13, 06:26 AM
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Ok, I included a picture.
 
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Old 08-19-13, 09:19 AM
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Yikes!!

what did she clean it with?
 
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Old 08-19-13, 09:44 AM
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It got worse over time since the wood was in an unprotected state. I would like to deal with it now since it does look gross.
 
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Old 08-19-13, 10:00 AM
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I would try to bleach this with oxalic acid; you need to get it covered again right away after you get the stain removed.
 
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Old 08-19-13, 02:04 PM
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What kind of finish was on the floor? It would be odd for a chair leg to remove that much finish but the surrounding wood doesn't look like it has much of a finish on it either. I might look at it as an excuse to sand the entire floor and refinish.
 
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Old 08-19-13, 04:31 PM
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If all else fails, do you have any of the original flooring left? I would replace at least 4 boards in a staggered fashion. I'll wait until you advise on the cleaning and availability of flooring.
 
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Old 08-19-13, 04:59 PM
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I am quite clueless about the floor. I bought the house in '95, had the floors "done" around 4 years ago. As to cleaning it I think my cleaning woman uses something called Murphy Oil Soap. What my mother used to "clean" the spot I have no idea.

To recap, to protect the floor I bought sets of plastic thingies that you hammer into the leg bottoms of chairs. One of the plastic protectors I guess cracked exposing a metal post which scratched the floor when the chair moved. It must have been a few days before I realized what happened leaving me with a damaged section to the floor.

I am not looking to make the spot "as good as new" but better than what it is now. I plan on selling my house in a year so I don't really want to sink money into it, just make it more presentable. I figured I would have to sand the area and stain/shellack or do what one needs to do the repair. Most posts seem to talk about fixing scratches not areas. I tried calling floor specialists but they don't want to deal with a one square foot repair job.
 
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Old 08-19-13, 05:04 PM
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Well, in your situation, cleaning, sanding, staining and finishing would be your best bet. My method would have entailed quite a bit of work and tools to accomplish, but it is doable. Try what the others have said and let us have pictures showing the results.
 
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Old 08-20-13, 03:51 AM
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I'd like to see another pic or two showing more of the rest of the floor. I don't know if it's the pic or what but the surrounding finish looks pretty dull. I'm afraid if you did any type of patch finish job it will have more sheen than the rest of the floor. Water based satin poly has the lowest sheen but your finish appears to have less sheen than that.
 
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Old 08-22-13, 09:52 AM
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I would recommend hiring a contractor that would cut out the damaged boards and replace them with new ones.

First you would need to find a box of (what looks like) hard sugar maple that's the exact same size as yours (2-1/4 or 3-1/4, hard to tell from photo). You should shop around and get some samples from retail stores in your area to see which product would match the best.

Your contractor will have to cut the tongue on the new boards and glue them down. The existing floor might be yellower than the new boards, but the new boards will also yellow and catch up to the color in a few years. Your new boards also might me 1mm higher than the rest of the floor, depending on how creative your contractor is.

Do not attempt this if your existing floor has already been sanded before, the difference in height will be more than 1mm in that case.

As for the board removal, your contractor should be able to cut them out if he knows what he's doing. Get someone who did a similar job before, a flooring specialist if possible.
 
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Old 08-22-13, 03:29 PM
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hiring a contractor
Why would you recommend the OP hiring a contractor on a DIY site? Totally incongruous. There's enough pros on the forum that we can direct DIYers into and out of most situations with reasonably good results.
 
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