Oak floor in kitchen questions - not the usual

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Old 08-30-13, 10:57 AM
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Oak floor in kitchen questions - not the usual

After careful consideration, we are going to be installing solid oak flooring to match our 2 1/4" x 3/4" existing floor. I consider ourselves fairly informed on this decision and the associated pros/cons. Here's two questions thought:

1. I do plan on adding some additional properly coated deck screws to the sub floor (lap board laid at 45 deg to the floor joists) just to add some rigidity that will hopefully help quiet the floor. It wasn't really noisy before but I did have to rip up a small section and I'm just thinking it would help. If there's some reason I shouldn't do this, please let me know.

2. Is there anything we should do between the subfloor and plank floor?

3. In front of the sink, range and possibly the fridge (we have a large open "U"), we would like to add some section that are "framed" in and stained a different color. Most of the floor would be laid in parallel planks but we would do at least a "one board width" border and then, inside of these, do something like stain the wood a different color or possibly use a different material and/or pattern. I'm just looking for any suggestions on what we might consider. We will have stainless appliance, likely hickory light-stain cabinets and quart counters. I'm thinking we could go with some kind of "wild" color stains and, in a few years say "what the heck, let's mix it up" and tear out just those sections and maybe do something different. Good idea? Any suggestions?

Thanks!
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Old 08-30-13, 02:00 PM
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IMO you are at the bare minimum with only 3/4" of subflooring and 1x as well. But you have oak installed in the rest of the house so only you know how quiet the floor is. You will use 15# felt paper between the subfloor and the oak planks to help quiet the floor.

You custom inlay needs to be well planned out. The main flooring should be installed perpendicular to the floor joists with only a small section of the border that runs parallel. I would need to see a schematic to try to figure out direction of lay, use of splines to change directions and biscuits to join the mitered corners. Short of face nailing or countersinking screws with plugs, it needs a good game plan.

With a tongue and groove, completely tied together floor, thinking of "mixing it up" down the road, tear out and re-install will be a bigger task than you probably think. Have extra of the main floor on hand parked away just in case.
 
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Old 08-30-13, 02:56 PM
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To add.....screw your initial subflooring to the joists using 2 1/2" ceramic coated decking torx screws. Apply your second layer of subflooring and screw it down, too, but intentionally miss the joists and screw into your planks only. It allows for some "slip". Good info from Z on the biscuiting and reversing splines. I agree wholeheartedly to putting down what you like. Mixing and matching won't be a viable option. It's not a puzzle that you can pull from without a bunch of sweat.
 
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Old 09-02-13, 08:43 PM
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Hey thanks everyone. I'm a bit perplexed about the need for an additional layer to the subfloor. The construction I'd be laying down for the kitchen is the exact same everywhere else in the house and it's "rock solid" and quite quiet. I was going to fasten it down more just because of the small cut-out section (which has been reinforced) and also just because the old flooring (3/4" fir T&G under the sheet vinyl) has been ripped up and had likely loosened the nails a bit. Oh and, yes, the oak T&G would be laid perpendicular to the floor joists.

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Old 09-03-13, 04:01 AM
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IMO if it works in the rest of your house - you'll probably be ok without the additional sub floor ..... but I'm a painter, not a carpenter
The pros want the extra floor strength because they can't be worried with having an unsatisfied customer and the extra plywood more or less garuntees there won't be any movement issues.
 
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