Welcome to the DoItYourself Forums!

To post questions, help other DIYers and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our DIY community. It's free!

Laminate - which room to do first??


glenf's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 13
AZ

09-10-13, 03:54 PM   #1  
Laminate - which room to do first??

I will be installing laminate in the living room, dining area, and kitchen for a total of about 500 sq. ft. Obviously, the living room at 15' x 20' is the largest and has the least trimming to do. I plan to install with no transitions. Should I start in the living room and then work my way into the dining area and kitchen or the other way around?

 
Sponsored Links
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation

Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 39,968
GA

09-10-13, 04:20 PM   #2  
I am not a fan of laminate, so that's out of the way. Not knowing your floor layout, it would be difficult for us to tell whether or not you can even do laminate without some sort of transition. Laminate in kitchen is a train wreck waiting to happen. Bear in mind that laminate is MDF with a picture of wood on it and coated with aluminum oxide. It gets wet it is usually ruined as it expands rather rapidly.....sort of like a dried sponge. Draw off your floor plan, save it as a JPEG file and post it as it is here; http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...your-post.html

 
Gunguy45's Avatar
Super Moderator

Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 20,666
AZ

09-10-13, 04:37 PM   #3  
Well, I like laminate...but not the new click lock type I've seen. I put down old style Pergo glue together stuff in an entryway with exterior wood glue and it held up very well for the 8 yrs I continued to live there.

That said...you have to use the quality sound deadening underlay and I still don't really like the look of some of the click lock. Seams are sometimes quite noticeable. And I would never use it in a kitchen or bath. A little tracked in rain or snow is one thing, but a dropped pan of boiling water or leakage past a shower curtain and there WILL be problems.

A drawing would be helpful and you also need to allow plenty of expansion room. Have you checked manufacturer sites to see what they say about the max dimension w/o some sort of break.


Vic
"I sometimes wonder how some people ever made it to adulthood..."

 
Furd's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 18,332
WA

09-10-13, 05:18 PM   #4  
I'm going to somewhat disagree with Chandler's stance concerning laminate getting wet. I have a Wilsonart laminate floor in my living room and it runs right up to the patio door. Since I live in the land of rain AND as yet have been unable to teach the cats to wipe their feet my floor gets quite a bit of water tracked in during the rainy season. I have had the laminate in place for at least ten years and there is NO sign of of it deteriorating from the water tracked in. Most of the time I do NOT wipe up this water.

So, as long as you wipe up any significant amount of spilled water from your laminate floor quickly I don't think you will have a serious problem. There IS one caveat, the Wilsonart flooring I have was top-of-the-line when installed. Laminate that you buy at Sam's Club or the mega-mart homecenter for $1.38 a square foot may indeed fall apart with just a slight amount of water.

 
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation

Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 39,968
GA

09-11-13, 03:09 AM   #5  
I think you justified my comment, Joel. Most people we see putting in laminate in our area are grabbing the 68 cent per sf Traffic Master from HD. Yours is a totally different animal, and I should have qualified my statement as you did. Thanks. I still don't like it.

 
czizzi's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator

Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 6,978
VA

09-11-13, 03:53 AM   #6  
I might add that most kitchen water issues are at the sink or dishwasher where a leak in the supply or drain goes un-noticed for a length of time. The floor gets wet from underneath not from surface splash which is easily wiped up. For kitchens with linoleum the first signs are usually a discolored look to the floor. By that time, it is too late. If you have to use laminate in a kitchen, I would make sure to use an underlayment that is also rated as a vapor barrier to prevent subfloor moisture from wicking into the laminate from below.

 
glenf's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 13
AZ

09-11-13, 11:01 AM   #7  
Layout of proposed Laminate installation

The attached floor plan shows the arrangement of the rooms. My wife wants the laminate in the living room, dining room, and kitchen with tile in the laundry and bathrooms and carpet in the remainder. The living room is approximately 19' x 14' and the sketch is to scale. My thought is to start along the living room wall which is 19' and work my way across the living room into the dining room and on to the kitchen. Your thoughts are???

Attached Images
     
 
illegalsmile's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 129
CO

09-11-13, 02:02 PM   #8  
Sounds like you have it figured out IMO. Unless the living room wall is completely caddywompus to the kitchen/dining wall you should have no problem.

 
Search this Thread