mannington or pergo?

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  #1  
Old 02-19-01, 02:32 PM
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We are looking to install about 600 sq. ft of laminent flooring and were wondering which is considered a better product. I see Pergo all over, but is it better? I have heard that Mannington is better, but is it? Price not being the determining factor, which do you all recommend and why?
 
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Old 02-19-01, 03:09 PM
Elite Flooring/Ken Fisher
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Kee:

I've dealt with both brands you mention, and have to give a thumbs up on Mannington as they've improved their product immensely over the past three years. I hated Mannington back then and wasn't fond of Pergo as well.

The Pergo glue takes too long to set up or bond with the core they use. I'm speaking from an installers standpoint, and not sales. The sales people don't know this stuff, unless they hang out with installers on occassion.

I guess what I'm trying to say is.. a proper glued laminate requires the use of "strap clamps" to insure a tight gapless fit, though it won't be a seamless looking floor like so many tend to oversell.

Pergo takes a good 90 minutes from my experience for the strapped area to stay intact after removing the clamps. On the other hand Mannington and their adhesive takes only 30-45 minutes, providing you don't walk on the newly glued area.

Mannington is very creative and I've seen some cool looking lines they have. I'd strongly suggest go with them over Pergo. But then of course, it's the installer that will prove the difference regardless of which you choose.

Are you the installer?
 
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Old 02-19-01, 03:14 PM
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Ken
Yes, I plan on being the installer. My prices showed the pergo was just a bit more $. I am doing about 600 SQ FT, counting a hallway.
 
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Old 02-20-01, 02:55 PM
Elite Flooring/Ken Fisher
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Yikes:

The dreaded hallways. This in itself can be hard not only for me...but a DIY'er. It takes alot of patience and layout for the hallways to work if the flooring runs the length of the hall and not the width. Generally the better look is running the flooring parellel to the hall wall lines itself, as it doesn't look "chopped up."

But it's the necessary expansion/contraction that is the upmost importance here. Sliding the flooring under door casings without proper expansion space is the cause of many DIY failures in that area. You can get some great information of the door casing undercutting with the instructions contained in each box of Pergo or Mannington.

What kind of power tools do you plan on using?

 
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Old 02-20-01, 03:34 PM
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Wow Ken!

I thought I'd just need a table saw and jig saw to do the cutting. I know I must clamp the pieces until they dry, but what all do you recommend for other tools? Also, the hallway is 40" wide by about 30' long. 3 rooms break off this hallway that will be in laminent, as well s 2 rooms in ceramic tile. I hope I'm not biting off more than I can chew, but carpet and vinyl have been easy, so I figured thsi must be alright too. This is a new construction, and I plan on doing the flooring as a last step, followed by the trim boards. Any other thoughts? Your help is appreciated, if it were not a $ issue, I would have the house done turn-key!
Thanks
Dan
 
  #6  
Old 02-27-01, 07:56 AM
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Keegan,
You may want to do some more research. I'm also planning a laminate floor installation. I've seen most of the home center brands too, but then I ran across Pickering on the net. It has a Lifetime warranty; intalls in the usual manner and they have a very good selection. Has anyone had any experience with Pickering laminates?
 
 

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