One room at a time, or...

Reply

  #1  
Old 10-09-13, 06:31 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 65
One room at a time, or...

All rooms at once?

I'm going to be installing laminate flooring this weekend. I have enough to do all of the rooms I plan on doing. I'll be putting it in my living room, hallway, and dining room. All of these rooms are connected so the flooring will flow from room to room. The problem is that I may only have time to get the dining room done. From what the instructions that came with my flooring say I'm supposed to go from one side of the room to the other on the first row and then use the remnant piece of flooring from the end of the first row to start the second row(see the link to the instructions).

So do I need to plan on going ahead and doing all of the rooms at once or can I just do the dining room for now and finish the other rooms as I have time? Either way is fine with me. I just want to be sure I do it right.

Here's a link to the instructions for my flooring
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 10-09-13, 11:20 PM
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 4,297
Going to have a transition strip at all door openings, you can not run laminate floor through the opening and continue into the next room.
 
  #3  
Old 10-10-13, 10:34 AM
czizzi's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 7,174
You will need to protect the edge of the floor if you do one room at a time. Purchase a laminate to vinyl reducer to protect the edge of the flooring from damage. Is the divider between room a doorway or a large archway?

Zamma Baytown Oak 1/2 in. Thick x 1-3/4 in. Wide x 72 in. Length Laminate Multi-Purpose Reducer Molding-013621531 at The Home Depot
 
  #4  
Old 10-11-13, 03:16 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 65
My hallway connects to my living room and the dining room connects to the other side of the living room. It's all open. The opening to the hallway is 3ft. The opening to my dining room is 7.5ft. The instructions for my flooring read as follows:
"Laminate flooring is installed as a floating floor and requires the use of T-moldings in doorways 4 ft (1.22m) or less and in rooms 40 feet (12.2 m) or larger in length or width. Floor movement must not be constrained by glue, nails, screws, hardware or other fixed obstructions"

Room dimensions:
Dining room: 10ft x 10ft
Living room: 25ft x 13ft
Hallway: 3ft x 16ft

I'm assuming that I'll need a T joint between the living room and hallway, but what about between my dining room and living room? My directions say use T joints in doorways 4ft or less but the opening to my dining room is 7.5ft. What do I do?

I've attached a diagram to help clear things up.
 
Attached Images  

Last edited by bigbob1122; 10-11-13 at 03:41 PM.
  #5  
Old 10-11-13, 03:47 PM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,968
Not necessarily since it is wider than 4' per the directions. It is going to depend on the way you lay it as there are no reversing splines in laminate so working around that 2 1/2' wall abutment will be problematic. Running lengthwise in the living room not so much a problem.
 
  #6  
Old 10-11-13, 06:35 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 65
I'll be laying it lengthwise(as in, the long side of the piece of laminate running from top to bottom in my picture) in order for it to intersect with my floor joists. So would I then run it from the dining room into the living room without a t joint?

As I said earlier I was really only planning on doing the dining room right now, so should I just go ahead and use a t joint in between the living room and dining room even though I technically don't need one there since the opening is greater than 4 feet? Can I even get a t joint that long? What's the best way to deal with the wall abutment? Aesthetically it doesn't really matter to me whether or not it flows from room to room and it seems like using a t joint would make things a lot easier.

In other words, how would you personally do it?
 
  #7  
Old 10-12-13, 03:10 AM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,968
I would not do laminate. I am not a laminate fan, but to each his own, so to speak. My comfort level with flooring starts with a good engineered flooring and goes up to nail down hardwood, since laminate is MDF with a picture of wood on it. Since you plan on doing the dining room first start on the left or right wall and let the laminate protrude into the opening slightly to center the joint piece. You can buy the T joints in 8' lengths, so you should be good there. How long before you do the other rooms? If a while, you may want to buy a teardrop termination piece to keep people from hanging and breaking the transition piece by stepping on it. OR, even better, just put a piece of 1x2 in front of the laminate across the opening, nailed down to protect the edges until you get back to it.
 
  #8  
Old 10-12-13, 09:49 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 65
Thanks for the advice.

I've already bought the laminate. The kind I bought is higher quality than a lot of what I've looked at in the past and it looks fairly realistic(it's surface isn't perfectly smooth, it actually has some distressing and "wood grain" running through it). It's still not wood but it looks better than some of the cheap stuff I've seen that literally looked like someone glued a picture of wood to a piece of plastic.

I'm planning on laying the rest in about a month so I'll do what you suggest with the 1x2.
 
  #9  
Old 10-12-13, 06:19 PM
Member
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 94
You don't need t-moldings in any of the doorways. The chances of the hall opening binding up are almost zero. If it does (which, again, I would bet my life it won't), you could always retrofit one in at a later date. Laminate, or any floating floor, doesn't need to go perpendicular to the joists; you can run it in any direction you want. Regarding your time crunch, the best and easiest way to lay this floor would be to start on the right hand wall, doing the living room and dining room at the same time and working toward the left living room wall. If you were able to prep the area (remove furniture, carpet, and tack strips, undercut door casings, etc.) ahead of time, I bet you could knock the floor in one day. Obviously you know more about you skills and energy level than I do, but your best bet is to try to do it all at once. If you have to leave off in the middle of the living room, you can either do what Chandler suggested or just leave it unprotected with the understanding that you would need to replace the last row (3-4 boards) when you finished the area. Do what ever you have to, but I've gotta tell you, most cutomers HATE moldings in between adjoining rooms.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes