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DIY Project


mikeleahy1234's Avatar
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10-13-13, 09:14 AM   #1  
DIY Project

Hello everyone

I am new to the forums and am based in Ireland. Nice to meet everyone

A few years ago i spent a lot of money on a house and to say the tiling was done badly is an understatement. They are porcelain tiles and there are large gaps between the tiles and the skirting boards and you could fall over some of the tiles they are so even. Lots of spiders come down under the skirting also

Fast forward 5 years and i am ready to fix up the whole situation (myself). I want to remove the porcelain tiles in the hallway / downstairs bathroom and kitchen , level the floors and then put down laminate timber flooring.

I know this is a large undertaking but i have plenty of time to do it right and no children etc so there is no urgency to finish the job once started. Having said that i want to do it right and make no mistakes .

I work in the IT sector so this kind of work is not natural to me, i will have to learn the skills needed but there is nothing that i cant do so i can do it!

Does anyone have any books they recommend i start with ? I have looked for an online training course for laminate floor installs but havent found anything. I need to learn it all im afraid. For instance , i dont know should i take up the skirting and put it back down, should i get new skirting, what tools i need, how i level the floors, how i take up the tiles, how the timber fits under the skirting, what i do with the architraves , etc etc etc.

I know you might say "get a tradesman to do it" - but i want to learn this stuff and want to do all my home improvements from now on.

I would appreciate any guidance / advice / help etc

 
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10-13-13, 09:27 AM   #2  
"get a tradesman to do it"
Welcome to the forums! We'd never say that unless the situation was such that we would just not be able to give sound advice, or if you had doubts yourself.

The first and most obvious thing would be to remove the tile and see what is under it. If there is no concrete backer underlayment or Ditra, then it was installed incorrectly, and from your description, my bet is on that. Once you have determined that, then you can proceed. Let us know what you find after removing a tile or two. Pictures always accelerate our ability to help you, since we can't see what you see.

I would recommend engineered flooring over laminate, since laminate is nothing more than MDF with a picture of wood on it and a coating of Aluminum Oxide. Engineered flooring will consist of layers of real wood with a substantial, resandable surface with the Aluminum Oxide finish.

We look forward to sharing with you what we can. http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...your-post.html

 
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10-14-13, 12:40 AM   #3  
Thanks for the reply

Actually before i undertake any of this , i was chatting to someone yesterday and he recommended to try laminate beading to see if it covers the gaps.

Has anyone ever seen / installed this on porcelain tiles ? I would paint it white obviously to mix in with the skirting board, i think its worth a shot

Any opinions ? If so what kind would look / fit best on tiles

 
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10-14-13, 02:42 AM   #4  
I had to google laminate "beading", as it is not a term regularly used here. It looks as if they use standard cove molding to hide irregularities in the wall to floor joint. We use shoe molding mostly. If your gap is wide, then the beading may work. Is your tile still in good shape?

 
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10-14-13, 03:31 AM   #5  
good shape as in damaged ? yeah its in fine shape, just put down terribly badly leaving large gaps between skirting and tile , these look very unsightly and lots of bugs come in these gaps

is it worth a go ? Should it be very narrow beading ?

 
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10-14-13, 03:54 AM   #6  
You may want to insert foam backer rod under the base molding (skirting) and fill the space with caulk, THEN apply an external molding such as shoe or, in your case, beading. This will probably do more to keep the critters at bay. If you want, you can post pictures of what you have, so we can see what you see. http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...your-post.html

 
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10-14-13, 04:03 AM   #7  
yep, the critters are ok, the issue is the gaps and large spiders. The beading should suffice for this

Attached is a picture of the gap in the kitchen :-(

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10-14-13, 06:03 PM   #8  
Aaah, closeups. We can't see anything. Can you back up and take a wider shot so we can put it into perspective?

 
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10-15-13, 12:23 AM   #9  
this one any better? Its just of one area but its almost all like this all over the ground floor

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10-15-13, 02:44 AM   #10  
Excellent. I would opt for shoe molding rather than the cove molding. It will give a cleaner look and narrower profile while covering that gap.

 
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10-15-13, 06:41 AM   #11  
ok thanks

so what is shoe moulding ???

Where can i buy it ? Can it be painted ?

Also, how do i put it down

Thanks again

 
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10-15-13, 01:22 PM   #12  
Shoe molding is an arched molding measuring approx 1/2" thick and 3/4" tall. It is installed by nailing it to your base molding with a brad nailer. I am really not sure where you would find it in Ireland unless you have a good lumber store or a box store such as Home Depot. It can be painted, and is often painted before installation.

 
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10-16-13, 12:18 AM   #13  
sounds like exactly what i need and from what i see online.

Dont see any online stores though, if you come across a place online you might let me know

Thanks

 
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