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Wood floor sanding and refinishig


sidny's Avatar
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Join Date: Mar 2009
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NY

10-20-13, 05:41 PM   #1  
Wood floor sanding and refinishig

Sorry, I don't see a forum for this topic. Here goes. I plan to sand and refinish a 400 sq ft living room in a house that is to be sold, just get it a little more presentable from were and tear. I have used both drum, and rotary sanders in the past. What types of floor finishes are popular, and reliable to use these days?
I thank you in advance.
Sid

 
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marksr's Avatar
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Join Date: Mar 2005
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TN

10-21-13, 03:17 AM   #2  
A drum sander is quicker and does a better job BUT requires more skill to use. If you aren't careful you can sand dips into the flooring with a drum sander. A buffer is more diy friendly but takes longer. You can also rent a floor sander that uses large square sanding pads.

How bad is the floor? I've freshened up floor finishes before by just lightly sanding and applying a fresh coat of poly ...... or do you need to get down to raw wood and start over?


retired painter/contractor avid DIYer

 
sidny's Avatar
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Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 617
NY

10-21-13, 06:41 AM   #3  
The floor

I was considering doing it myself because I got three bids, all between 900, and 1000, so I am figuring I may just doing it myself, if I can do it for less than 300. I was wondering what people are finishing wood [oak] floors these days.
Yes it has to come down to bare wood, there is some staining.
Sid

 
marksr's Avatar
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10-21-13, 10:34 AM   #4  
What color stain to use basically comes down to personal preference. Normally it takes 3 coats of poly [sanding lightly between coats and removing dust] to get a nice even finish. The top coat can be either oil base poly or waterbased. Water based poly dries quicker with less odor but doesn't change the wood color any and often doesn't wear as well/long as oil base. Oil base poly dries to a harder film and deepens the colors naturally in the wood. It also ambers some as it ages. There are 3 basic sheens in either type of poly; satin, semi-gloss and gloss.

The material costs are minimal, labor is the biggest cost although you would be paying them for their machine [versus you renting] and their skill at operating it. You might consider getting quotes for just the sanding [getting it ready for stain]


retired painter/contractor avid DIYer

 
stickshift's Avatar
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10-21-13, 11:58 AM   #5  
Personally, on oak I would skip the stain and just go with the three coats of poly, since I use oil based poly and it adds a little amber tint.

 
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