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New plywood subfloor


Hapykhiken's Avatar
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TX

10-22-13, 07:59 PM   #1  
New plywood subfloor

Hey all!

Next weekend I plan on ripping up the carpet and subfloor in the room I have fondly named The Dog Pee Room (I recently inherited the family home, including all of the pee the evil Yorkies left behind).

I've read conflicting info, so I'm just trying to get clarification.

Long term, I want to install hardwood (likely engineered) or bamboo in the room. For now, I want it to stop smelling like piss.

For the new subfloor, I've read many things.

I live in north Texas, for what it's worth.

Do I leave gaps (1/8" is the common number given) around ALL seams in my new subfloor? That seems like a bad idea to me, but other forums and DIY websites recommended it. Should if use tongue and groove plywood? I am hard working and always double check my resources, but I'm a novice at non-cosmetic renovations. Is tongue and groove easy enough for me to work with, or should I stick with regular sheets?

I plan on using construction adhesive and screws to adhere the plywood to the joists.

Thanks!

(Also, I apologize for any weird typos or word substitutions if you found any. iOS 7 is clearly my arch nemesis and doesn't understand how TYPING WORKS)

 
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joecaption1's Avatar
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10-22-13, 09:48 PM   #2  
I have not used plywood for subflooring in at least 10 years.
I only use 3/4" Advantech T & G.
Far more moisture resistant, it will never delaminate.
No way would I use anything but T & G what ever you choose for subflooring.
With T & G there's no way for it to flex between the joist.
Far faster and about 1/2 the price to use ring shanked 8D nails.
Unless you have a stand up screw gun driving all those screws will get old real quick.

 
Hapykhiken's Avatar
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10-23-13, 02:54 AM   #3  
Thank you!

Like I said, I'm definitely a novice on non-cosmetic updating. I'll definitely check out the product you recommend.

With tongue and groove and the nails you mentioned, should I still use construction adhesive? I would assume yes.

 
marksr's Avatar
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10-23-13, 03:22 AM   #4  
Is the pee stained plywood solid? If it is, you can apply a good fluid coat of pigmented shellac like Zinnser's BIN to seal in the odor.


retired painter/contractor avid DIYer

 
Hapykhiken's Avatar
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10-23-13, 07:03 PM   #5  
I'll know more about the overall condition of the subfloor when I rip the carpet entirely up. From what I've seen (looking around the edges), it appears to have been thoroughly soaked through with urine over the course of 15 years and three dogs (and a cat).

If the floor appears to be solid, overall (to which I have my doubts, hence my desire to just replace), would the shellac you recommended really and truly seal in ANY smells? I don't want any smells creeping back in months or years...

 
marksr's Avatar
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10-24-13, 03:46 AM   #6  
As long as you fully coat the plywood, the BIN will seal the odors. You can't dry brush/roll it on, it has to be a wet fluid coat of primer! Before the advent of Kilz, pigmented shellac was the go to coating to seal fire damaged jobs. A good fluid coat of pigmented shellac seals in the smoke smell so it won't come back during periods of high humidity. Urine has a stronger odor but the principle is the same. BIN has a long track record of doing a good job of sealing odors including urine.

That said, I would replace any plywood that you have doubts about being structurally sound! I've worked on a lot of MHs where it was necessary to replace the subfloor along the perimeter [water damage] Depending on the floor covering used, you might want to overlay the entire subfloor with 3/8" or 1/2" ply. Either way, any urine stained wood that remains needs to be sealed with BIN!


retired painter/contractor avid DIYer

 
Gary in WA's Avatar
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10-24-13, 07:23 PM   #7  
Yes, use T&G and glue the groove when installing. You are not required to use T&G or block the edges with hardwood flooring, but I would, Table 1, footnote "a"; http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j...KEftFQ&cad=rja

Gary

 
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10-25-13, 03:20 AM   #8  
I disagree with gluing the groove on Advantech (similar) subflooring. It needs that space free.

 
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10-25-13, 11:26 AM   #9  
Required for a stronger floor, I didn't learn that in my career until the internet began; For field-glued floors, use adhesive meeting APA Specification AFG=01 or ASTM D3498, applied in accordance with the manufacturer’s recommendations. If OSB panels with sealed surfaces and edges are used, use only solvent-based glues; check with panel manufacturer. Apply a continuous line of glue (1/4” thick) on joists, and continuous or spaced line of glue (1/8” thick) in groove of tongue-and-groove panels. Use 6d ring or screw-shank nails spaced 12” o.c. at panel ends and intermediate bearings. From pp. 16; under “C - FLOORS”, #2 Combined subfloor-underlayment".

http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j...,d.cGE&cad=rja

Also on page 5; "C" #2; http://www.texasinspector.com/Floor%20Squeaks.pdf

Gary

 
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10-25-13, 12:31 PM   #10  
Oops.... "Should I use a construction adhesive when installing my AdvanTech subfloor?

Using a construction adhesive on floor joists as well as at T and G joints will help increase the stiffness of a floor system. It will also help eliminate floor squeaks and nail popping. For AdvanTech subflooring and sheathing panels, a solvent or polyurethane based construction adhesive should be used. To prevent skinning of the adhesive prior to attachment of the panel, only enough adhesive should be spread for one or two panels. A quarter inch bead of adhesive should be applied to all joist surfaces. For wide surfaces, use a double bead or a serpentine pattern." From; Technical Information | Huber Engineered Woods

Gary

 
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