Removed tile to put floating laminate - question about leveling


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Old 12-22-13, 10:56 PM
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Removed tile to put floating laminate - question about leveling

Hi all,

I had a small area of tile, about 4' x 4', by the front door. I've removed it and the surrounding floor to place laminate floating floor. The sub floor is a concrete slab. My question is regarding the thin set that was under the tile. It was well done job and grand old time to remove. I primarily used a reciprocating saw and scraper blades and finished with hammer and chisel. Its pretty cleaned up but I wouldnt say 100% level. How cleaned up does it need to be with this type flooring? I am familiar with laying tile and would definitely work it more if that is what I was installing, but I have no experience with the click together floating stuff.

I was thinking of getting a grinder and masonry disc or something to try and clean up the remainder but I also dont want to waste my time, back, or tools if I dont have too I can take a picture if it would help clarify but was hoping for some general advice on the topic.

Thanks in advance!
 
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Old 12-23-13, 04:10 AM
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Welcome to the forums! Is there a good reason you removed tile to replace it with a product that, when wet, will become unstable? How are you going to handle the 1/2" expansion at the edges? I am assuming this is at an entrance door, where wet boots will take their toll.

To answer your question, it needs to be pretty flat in order to install a floating floor. IMO, you will be better off with maybe a different color of tile.
 
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Old 12-23-13, 06:42 AM
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I totally agree.
Now there's going to a trip hazard where you have to use transition strips.
Going to need a pad under it with a vapor barrier.
Going to need a hammer drill to be able to install the anchors to hold the transition strips in places and ideally a compound miter saw to cut the strips at a 45.
Laminate will span small holes but can not be laid over high spots.
 
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Old 12-23-13, 10:34 AM
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Welcome to the forums! Is there a good reason you removed tile to replace it with a product that, when wet, will become unstable? How are you going to handle the 1/2" expansion at the edges? I am assuming this is at an entrance door, where wet boots will take their toll.

To answer your question, it needs to be pretty flat in order to install a floating floor. IMO, you will be better off with maybe a different color of tile.
Hi, and thank you for the welcome and reply. The tile was a small patch and the wife is dead set on laminate for this room. Trust me, try as I might she won't consider hard wood. The existing tile would have looked horrible as it was a small patch in front of the door and would have been surrounded by laminate. We have a mud room area out front, so wet boots aren't too much of a concern. The real danger is from the 1 and 3 yr olds running around with cups of milk Also it was pretty low quality in my opinion, not thru body and had a few small chips already. I will be putting tile in the living room and kitchen area but there is no tile there to get up.

I totally agree.
Now there's going to a trip hazard where you have to use transition strips.
Going to need a pad under it with a vapor barrier.
Going to need a hammer drill to be able to install the anchors to hold the transition strips in places and ideally a compound miter saw to cut the strips at a 45.
Laminate will span small holes but can not be laid over high spots.

Ok so it sounds like I am best off grinding any high spots down. Pretty sure I got rid of any bumps that were close to 1/16" but Ill go over it with a grinder to be sure. Any tips on how to ensure I get a good flat result? Or to verify the subfloor is good to go. I was planning just using my small level all over but that doesn't seem like the most reliable way. It seems good to me, but I still need to vacuum up and clear everything out to get a better view.

Thanks, and I appreciate your help.
 

Last edited by echosummet; 12-23-13 at 10:36 AM. Reason: grammar and spelling
 

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