Laying plank flooring diagonally

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Old 02-07-14, 07:35 AM
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Laying plank flooring diagonally

I'm laying plank flooring in four rooms connected by a common foyer. I am planning on laying this flooring on the diagonal, but can find little information or tips for doing this. Specifically, I'd like to know what other people have done in transitioning from room to room, tips on negotiating door jambs and closets. I have never done this before and would appreciate any help I can get.
 
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Old 02-07-14, 08:50 AM
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I really don't know of anything special other than measuring for cuts sometimes needs to be more precise. When I did it I simply used a plank of flooring run from door jamb to jamb and butted the 45 degree flooring up to it. There was one section where I had two doorways close by and got to the point where both ends of the planks needed the 45 degree cut. I cut and fitted that difficult area without nailing anything in place. I started leaving the boards slightly long and took cuts a fraction of a blade width off until I got things fitting perfectly. Then once I was satisfied that everything would fit the way I wanted then I nailed it all down.
 
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Old 02-07-14, 03:27 PM
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Thanks for that tip! I am using click-lock laminate; so nailing is not an option. I have a lot of doorways. Each of the four rooms has a closet, the foyer has a closet, and doorways to enter each of those rooms. I figure I have two options for extending the floor into the closets and foyer. My preference would be to have one continuous run of diagonal floor boards without interruption. I'm anticipating that this might be more difficult than I can handle, so I am prepared to use T-moldings in the thresholds and straight boards in the closets if necessary. Do you have any suggestions for getting started? I've prepared and leveled the sub-floor, made my diagonal line across the center of the floor and also in the corner I wish to start.
 
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Old 02-08-14, 03:59 AM
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I use a laser or chalk line to get around corners so you can run continuously through doorways and into adjoining rooms & closets. Establish a 45 degree line through the doorway. Use the laser or chalk line to project the line into the adjoining room or closet. Then carefully measure back from that line in both rooms for a starting point for your wood. So, both rooms have wood aligned and would connect if the wall was not in the way. Then start laying your wood on both sides and progress laying at about the same rate. Occasionally measure up to the line in both rooms to make sure both sets of wood are the same. When you get to the doorway you want both rooms the same exact amount from the line so in the door you can just run your planks right on through and both rooms align.
 
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Old 02-08-14, 07:32 AM
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Choose your starting corner and take two whole boards and cut a 45* angle on one side (opposite for the other board). Take these to the corner and place them where they need to go. Use spacers on the walls and take the scrap cuts from the 45" you cut and put them in the middle of the boards behind them and nail or screw them to the floor. This should give you a solid starter row to begin with.

In terms of laying them down, always sit with the boards at 90" to your position. Forget about the walls as they will trick you. If you stay orientated at 90" it is no different than laying a regular floor. When you get to an obstacle, have a framing square or speed square handy as most all cute will be at 45*. Measure and use the square to transfer the line. Under cut your doors jambs and casings. If you are using moldings at the doors, it will be easy to slide the flooring under to hide the edges.

When you get done and need to fill in the final rows in the corner you started at, take a utility knife and score off the ridge that is found on the tongue of the board. Use some laminate or engineered flooring glue to run a small bead on the tongue, slide the boards together and use blue tape to hold them in place for the glue to set up.
 
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Old 02-08-14, 02:32 PM
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Thanks Czizzi. That was exactly what I needed to know about the corners. I am using a hand jam saw to notch the door jambs and an oscillating tool to continue the undercuts. The jambs and casings are solid oak and so far it has been quite difficult. I am hoping that some better blades will allow me to get the distance I need.
 
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Old 02-08-14, 02:40 PM
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Dane, are you saying that you would be working in two rooms at once? I assumed that I would treat the doorways as obstacles to cut around and that once I got through the doorways I would proceed in both directions from that point.
 
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Old 02-08-14, 04:49 PM
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If you are battling oak jambs and casings, you may want to look into renting a jamb saw. It will make short work of the cutting. You could buzz through all the undercuts and return the saw for a minimal time allotment. Your oscillating saw will do nothing except set of your smoke alarms.
 
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Old 02-09-14, 05:09 AM
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Smile jam saw

I'll rent a jam saw today. Thanks.
 
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