Care for hardwood floor

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  #1  
Old 02-17-14, 07:41 AM
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Care for hardwood floor

I live in a house built in 1993. It has very nice hardwood floors installed. We recently had a splinter on one of the boards going with the grain. One of the kids got their sock caught on it. The boards range from 3.5" to 5.5". The board w/ splinter is 5.5". I pulled up the splinter to prevent any future sock catching. I removed about 1.5" of approximately 1/32" wide splinter, from the edge of the board. If I run my hand over the area you can feel a little bump but nothing sharp. I am not sure of the type of wood. It is light colored.
I have a few questions
What should I Do w/ current situation? I am thinking sand it a little and then fill it. I am thinking fill it with clear nail polish and not wood filler. I would be filling it for practical reasons not decorative reasons. I am a little concerned that when sanding the bump it may remove finish from surrounding area.
What may have caused this issue originally? Just normal wear & tear? If normal wear & tear, should I get floors refinished now to prevent more wear and tear?
We did have a floor company come in about 5 years ago for an overall assessment and they said everything looked fine. How often should floors be looked at for overall assessment?
Thanks for any replies
 
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  #2  
Old 02-17-14, 10:28 AM
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I'm guessing it was just a bad board or bad spot in that board. Changing temperature and humidity can exasperate the situation but generally there's not much you need to do.

I would not use fingernail polish in the crack or divot left from the splinter. I'd use polyurethane which you can get from most home centers. Use a small modeling paint brush, Q-tip or toothpick to only apply the poly into the divot area and let it dry. This will keep the poly only in the recessed area so you don't have to worry about anything raised that might need sanding.
 
  #3  
Old 02-17-14, 12:25 PM
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I like PD's suggestion if you did want to fill the void, I'd use colored putty. It's generally sold in the same area you'll find stain/poly. To keep from sanding, you'd apply the poly to just the putty. I've used q-tips for small touch ups, they work well and no need to clean them up when you're done

If you were to sand, you'd need to sand an entire board and poly that whole board. There are 3 basic sheens of poly; satin, semi-gloss and gloss. So on anything more than a minor touch up you'd need to determine which sheen you have.
 
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Old 02-17-14, 07:24 PM
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Thank you both. Sounds like I should focus on this repair and not necessarily be worried about the rest of the floor. I know it's tough to say when you can't see the rest of the floor but overall one splinter does not mean whole floor needs to be resurfaced. Are there any warning signs for when you may need to resurface?
Thx again to your replies
 
  #5  
Old 02-18-14, 04:09 AM
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Generally the wood holds up forever or until it's damaged or completely worn away. The finish is what wears out. A slightly worn finish can be scuff sanded and recoated to rejuvenate it. If the finish is worn thru down to the stain or bare wood, you need to completely sand it down and start over. Installers try to cull out any suspect boards before they nail them down. Unless it was damaged somehow, the odds are you just had a bad board.
 
  #6  
Old 03-06-14, 02:05 PM
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marksr - I have been looking to confirm the steps to apply poly when using wood putty. so once I sand (and clean) the floors, applying wood putty prior to poly is the correct step......right?? just need confirmation
 
  #7  
Old 03-06-14, 02:16 PM
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It depends on the type of putty you are using. If it's a stainable oak filler [a tan paste] you apply it prior to the final sanding before stain or poly. If it's a colored putty, you stain [or not] and apply the 1st coat of poly before using the colored putty.
 
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