Floating OSB over concrete as subfloor?

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Old 02-26-14, 03:28 PM
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Floating OSB over concrete as subfloor?

Is it possible to install OSB as floating subfloor (perhaps two 3/8 layers of OSB with overlapping seams) and then engineered hardwood on top?

I know that the standard installation of engineered hardwood on slab calls for glue directly on a prepared concrete surface. But I donít like the glue and concrete surface prep as a DIY project. I also imagine that removing the glue sometime in the future will be quite difficult, should the floor eventually need replacement. With a floating OSB option you can ultimately remove everything (cut up engineered floor and OSB subfloor) throw away and start from scratch in a couple of hours.
 
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Old 02-26-14, 04:19 PM
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I know that the standard installation of engineered hardwood on slab calls for glue directly on a prepared concrete surface


A floating engineered floor need a cushion and a vapor barrier to float over concrete. Many underlayments for engineered do both. You do not have to add OSB or any subflooring over the concrete.
 
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Old 02-26-14, 05:57 PM
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Most modern engineered flooring is click and lock and certainly would not be glued. A moisture barrier is placed beneath it as Z stated. Have you checked for slab moisture, yet?
 
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Old 02-26-14, 06:47 PM
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Unpressure treated wood should never be in direct contact with concrete.
OSB would soak up moisture like a sponge.
 
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Old 02-27-14, 11:29 AM
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Yes, I do intend to install vapor barrier. The idea was to use the floating OSB to either glue, nail or staple the engineered floor and still have an easily removable floor. I see few engineered floors that recommend a floating installation, and Iím not sure about the result. Will it feel like laminate if I directly float engineered floor over concrete? (with vapor barrier, of course). I have done a couple of rooms in laminate and Iíd like to try something with a more solid feel .
I have not tested the concrete for moisture content. House is 20y old in N California, rather dry climate. There are no water marks and other signs of moisture on the concrete. The soil is on the sandy side so water does not pool.
 
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Old 02-27-14, 01:14 PM
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I see no need in planning for the future of a floor that should last a lifetime, or at least until you sell the house. Click lock 5/8"+ engineered flooring is far superior to your clacky laminate. Apples and pears. The last I installed for a client (almost 800 sf) still feels like rock, with no movement and no clacky sound when you walk on it. Engineered flooring can be refinished as well. Laminate is only a picture of wood on a piece of MDF, and is not refinishable.
 
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Old 02-27-14, 04:36 PM
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In addition to click and go engineered, I have also installed a number of glue together engineered floors. The fact that the pieces are all glued together lends itself to a more solid floor system. More time consuming than a click and go to install, but looks like a nail down floor.
 
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Old 02-28-14, 10:10 AM
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Yes, thanks. Iíll spend a bit more time looking at the glue together options. One advantage I see as a DIY is the luxury of doing the floor in sections, thus allowing the glue to harden. Perhaps do three rooms in parallel, small sections in each room every day.

But in any case, is the OSB option overkill or would it actually be detrimental? I have for example installed nail down bamboo floors (tongue and groove with hidden nails) but on a wooden subfloor, perimeter foundation. I thought the OSB would give me the option to install a nail down floor on the concrete slab. No?
 
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