3 in 1 and Cork Underlayment

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  #1  
Old 04-23-14, 09:13 AM
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3 in 1 and Cork Underlayment

Hey All-

I recently purchased approximately 400sq ft of Laminate Wood Flooring to replace carpet in my office and Master Bedroom. I completed the install in the office, and learned a lot along the way. Now that the flooring is in the office, I want to add additional cushion/sound dampening in the Master. My question is if it's OK to lay a cork underlayment over the top of a 3 in 1 underlayment? The 3 in 1 is very thin and does not provide much sound deadening. The subfloor is concrete and the house was just built in 2013.
 
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Old 04-23-14, 02:02 PM
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Nice job, try to stagger your boards a little more and cut each board into thirds to get a stair step effect. That way you won't get the repeat lines you notice in your floor pictured.

As far as additional sound proofing? Underlayment is for sound deadening not sound proofing. There also is a limit as to how much and how thick the underlayment can be. Too thick and it forces the click lock mechanism to flex too much and can lead to either failure of the lock system or a very noisy floor. The nature of the beast is that Laminate Flooring sounds hollow. It will never replicate a nail down system and is one of the trade offs you accept when you go laminate.
 
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Old 04-23-14, 03:06 PM
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Great feedback on both accounts. Is there a stated maximum as far as the max thickness? Would I be better off swapping the 3 in 1 for a standard moisture barrier, and adding cork to quiet things down and limit the thickness?
 
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Old 04-23-14, 03:58 PM
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Default to your flooring specific manufacturer recommendations. Most likely, it calls for a standard "find it everywhere" underlayment. If they make one of their own, they may recommend that, but that may be a gimmick to sell more product. You don't need much more than a run of the mill unless you are on a slab and need a moisture barrier. Again, you will not notice anything appreciable in sound difference. You may however notice a deeper hole in your wallet.
 
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